Chippewa Valley Schools bond proposal approved

By: Alex Szwarc | C&G Newspapers | Published November 6, 2018

 Voting precinct 23 at Huron Elementary School in Clinton Township on Nov. 6. As of 11 p.m. on Election Day, voters approved the Chippewa Valley Schools bond proposal by a tally of 20,826 to 13,078.

Voting precinct 23 at Huron Elementary School in Clinton Township on Nov. 6. As of 11 p.m. on Election Day, voters approved the Chippewa Valley Schools bond proposal by a tally of 20,826 to 13,078.

Photo by Alex Szwarc

CLINTON TOWNSHIP/MACOMB TOWNSHIP — On Nov. 6, residents approved the Chippewa Valley Schools bond proposal.

According to unofficial results from the Macomb County elections website, as of 11 p.m. on Tuesday, 48 percent of precincts reported results, with 20,826 ‘yes’ votes being cast, representing 61.4 percent of the total vote. Almost 39 percent of the vote, or 13,078, were ‘no’ votes.

The safety, security and school improvement proposal asked voters to approve the district to borrow $97 million for, as a press release from Chippewa Valley Schools states, in part, “Would fund security enhancements at existing buildings and facilities including security cameras, replacement of door locks, improved interior door systems and more secure entryways and replace buses that are the oldest in the fleet.”

Funds would also provide students with state-of-the-art instructional technology and increased access to career and technical education programs.

The biggest focus of the bond proposal is student safety, Chippewa Valley Schools Superintendent Ron Roberts said, and updating and improving security at schools.

In May 2017, voters voted down an $89.9 million bond proposal that looked to address some of the same issues, including parking lots, safety measures and other infrastructure needs.

Now that the bond has passed, the district said all spending will be tracked and made available on a public website.

On Tuesday morning, outside of Huron Elementary School in Clinton Township, voters shared how they voted on the proposal and the reasoning behind their thinking.

“I voted yes because schools are always getting cut and the budgets are being slashed,” Matt D. said. “I wanted to do my part to help them out.”

Craig L. said that prior to voting, he didn’t know the proposal would be on the ballot.

“I voted no because I didn’t know what it was for. Had I known more, I might’ve had a different opinion of it,” he said.