My Dream Dress Bridal Salon Manager Destiny Butler fluffs up a gown by Morilee tried on by fashion director Krissy Hoffman.

My Dream Dress Bridal Salon Manager Destiny Butler fluffs up a gown by Morilee tried on by fashion director Krissy Hoffman.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Southfield businesses reflect on importance of shopping local

By: Mike Koury | Southfield Sun | Published November 23, 2021

  In addition to bridal gowns from Morilee and House of Wu, My Dream Dress Bridal Salon also carries jewelry and other accessories for wedding days.

In addition to bridal gowns from Morilee and House of Wu, My Dream Dress Bridal Salon also carries jewelry and other accessories for wedding days.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

 My Dream Dress Bridal Salon Stylist Kayla Melonson looks  through the gowns by House of Wu Nov. 17.

My Dream Dress Bridal Salon Stylist Kayla Melonson looks through the gowns by House of Wu Nov. 17.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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SOUTHFIELD — Small Business Saturday takes place Nov. 27, and local businesses in the area are preparing for the busy shopping day.

Small Business Saturday is the companion holiday event to Black Friday and is aimed at getting customers to local businesses instead of the notable name-brand stores.

The event has been even more important over the past year and a half since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, as there has been a focused effort to gather more attention on local businesses.

Patrick Coleman, the owner of Beans & Cornbread, said his business has been pretty steady since the pandemic started.

“Our carryout business has increased significantly compared to pre-COVID numbers, but we’re holding our own,” he said. “The only real issue we have is just a lack of human resources, a lack of labor. We’ve cut back the number of hours that we’re open. We open one hour later, and it’s all due to a lack of having labor.”

June Eaton, the owner of My Dream Dress Bridal Salon, also has recognized how her business has had to gradually adjust to the new normal following the pandemic.

“From where you would probably have an influx of appointments pre-COVID, we’ve probably limited that to about 50%, maybe 40% due to the way people have approached going into purchasing nowadays,” she said. “They’re a little apprehensive because they don’t know what to expect in the next year with various things of that nature.

“We’ve kind of pivoted where we’ve done a lot of things where we’ve reduced pricing,” she continued, “tried to make a little bit more accommodations where we have more private appointments, limited the amount of people inside on appointments where we would used to allow as many guests as you would like, but with that said, (business is) increasing over time.”

Beans & Cornbread, a single-unit restaurant located at 29508 Northwestern Highway that specializes in southern cooking, has been in Southfield for around 24 years.

Usually around the time of Small Business Saturday, the restaurant offers specials and gift certificates for customers. Coleman also noted that the business works a lot of family gatherings and workplace holiday gatherings during this time, and it tries to give back to the community as much as it can.

“Small businesses are the cornerstones of communities,” he said. “Beans & Cornbread opened in 1997. It’s a place where people come to dine, people celebrate all types of special occasions, whether it’s a birthday, anniversary. … We’re very, very involved in the community. We consider ourselves a partner. We give back. Seniors and kids are near and dear to us, so I think it’s very important to have small businesses, and it’s a two-way street. They have to support and provide for the community, and in turn, the community has a nice place to go and break bread.”

Eaton’s dress salon has been operating in Southfield since 2014 and currently is located at 19471 W. 10 Mile Road. She believes her business will be able to break even in 2021 versus the losses her bridal shop suffered over the past few years.

In speaking about the importance of small businesses to the local community, Eaton said the community looks at them as a consistent draw for them to come to when they’re in need of both its bridal formal wear and for social occasions.

“Reliability is one of the things I’m key on, and making sure that we stay consistent and reliable in our community so that people can always depend on us to deliver in our local community,” she said. “They say a lot of businesses just come and go so we just want to be the reliable source.”

While the bridal show won’t be doing anything specific for Small Business Saturday, its winter community involvement this year, Eaton said, consists of collecting coats for families in need.

“We offer our brides some type of incentive for bringing us a brand-new coat and to donate to that cause so we can donate it to our local schools or those agencies that are in need,” she said.

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