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 Michael Vissotski, one of the owners of Vima Wealth Management, wanted to use and preserve this building, built in 1915 at 46 E. Square Lake Road, seen before they started renovating it.

Michael Vissotski, one of the owners of Vima Wealth Management, wanted to use and preserve this building, built in 1915 at 46 E. Square Lake Road, seen before they started renovating it.

Photo provided by Mike Vissotski


Business owners use sweat equity to preserve historical building in Troy

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published March 4, 2020

 Vissotski suits up to remove a large beehive on the back porch during renovations.

Vissotski suits up to remove a large beehive on the back porch during renovations.

Photo provided by Mike Vissotski

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TROY — When Michael Vissotski, one of the owners of  Vima Wealth Management, and his two partners purchased the historical building built in 1915 at 46 E. Square Lake Road, east of Livernois Road, last summer, it was pretty beaten up.

“The inspector said the structure was sound,” Vissotski said.

So they hired a carpenter, an electrical contractor and a laborer, but they rolled up their sleeves and did the bulk of the work themselves. They finished the work about three weeks ago.

Loraine Campbell, the executive director for the Troy Historic Village, said the land was originally owned by Johnson Niles. The building was originally built as a home, and was later used by Gleb Associates as an insurance company.

The partners — Vissotski, Michael Mazzola and Michel Tenaglia — did the majority of the renovation work, Vissotski said. This included the gutters, siding and interior work.

“We gutted the place. We didn’t change anything outside,” he said. “It was pretty much full time. … It was a complete facelift. It wasn’t kept up. We’re pretty proud of it.”

The building is zoned commercial for the first floor and residential for the second floor, which has a renter in each upstairs apartment.

Vissotski explained that the Troy Historic District Commission approved of their plans. A permit was needed for the siding.

He estimates the cost of the renovation at about $60,000 — mostly materials, not counting his and his partners’ labor.

“I’ve driven by this building and always thought I wanted to be there,” Vissotski said. “I’m into historic architecture. I love Romeo. I liked the way this building looked. It’s a great location. The price was worth it. I actually enjoyed it. I have a construction background.”

“Investment in a historic building is a good thing,” said Community Development Director R. Brent Savidant. “The only way to save a historic building is to use it. It’s exciting to see a company investing in this important historic building.”

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