Boy, 3, hosts lemonade stand to benefit charity

By: Alex Szwarc | Macomb Township Chronicle | Published August 30, 2019

 Easton Clark, 3, of Macomb Township, hosted a lemonade stand Aug. 14. He raised over $900 for Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids of Michigan.

Easton Clark, 3, of Macomb Township, hosted a lemonade stand Aug. 14. He raised over $900 for Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids of Michigan.

Photo provided by Amber Clark

 Macomb County Sheriff’s Office deputies Nikita Petrovskiy, left, and Jacob Stark, right, flank Easton Clark and Anthony Allen. Clark was diagnosed with alopecia areata when he was 1.

Macomb County Sheriff’s Office deputies Nikita Petrovskiy, left, and Jacob Stark, right, flank Easton Clark and Anthony Allen. Clark was diagnosed with alopecia areata when he was 1.

Photo provided by Amber Clark

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MACOMB TOWNSHIP — Easton Clark is only 3, but that doesn’t mean he can’t contribute in a positive way.

The Macomb Township youngster, who was diagnosed with alopecia areata when he was 1, held a lemonade stand Aug. 14.

Over $900 was raised, which goes toward Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids of Michigan.

The National Alopecia Areata Foundation states that alopecia areata is a common autoimmune skin disease, causing hair loss on the scalp, face and sometimes on other areas of the body. It affects as many as 6.8 million people in the U.S. with a lifetime risk of 2.1%.

Easton’s mother, Amber Clark, said the goal of the lemonade stand was to raise awareness for alopecia and also money for Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids.

Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids Wellness Center and Salon in St. Clair Shores is a nonprofit that provides wigs and support services at no charge to children and young adults experiencing hair loss due to cancer, alopecia, trichotillomania, burns and other disorders.

“His lemonade stand was super successful, raising just over $900,” Amber said. “It was a great experience for him and also a great way to inform people about alopecia.”

Alopecia areata can develop among people of all ages, both sexes and all ethnic groups.

Amber said the skin disease doesn’t affect Easton much.

“Right now, we don’t do treatment and he doesn’t seem to mind it at all,” she said. “There are treatment options, but they aren’t guaranteed to work.”

She said people with alopecia don’t know when or how much hair they’ll lose.

“Just after he turned 1, he lost all of his hair, but it all came back,” Amber said. “A year later, he started losing patches.”

Amber said the idea to have a lemonade stand came from another local family who has a little girl with alopecia.

“Through Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids, she took Easton in as one of her kids and I used to donate my hair there,” Amber said. “The last time I did it, Easton went in and turned the hair in and she used it.”

Amber said the organization sponsored a wig for the little girl whose mother started a Facebook fundraiser.

“We first thought we were going to donate, but then thought, what better way to spread awareness than to do a lemonade stand, and any money we raised from that would go to her Facebook fundraiser,” she said.

Maggie Varney, founder & CEO of Maggie’s Wigs 4 Kids, said she is delighted to see Easton’s generosity.

“I tell people all the time that this program is about kids helping kids,” she said. “These are kids doing this and the impact is great. I’m overwhelmed with emotion when these kids show kindness.”

Amber’s message to those who supported her son through his lemonade stand was, “Thank you for coming out, showing support and raising awareness. Aside from raising funds, awareness is the best thing we can do for our community.”

Varney said the Clarks will be given choices on how the organization uses the donation.

What made Easton’s day, Amber said, was when Macomb County Sheriff’s Office deputies Nikita Petrovskiy and Jacob Stark stopped by for a glass of lemonade.

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