Warren City Council at-large candidate Gary Boike, a retired Hamtramck police officer, praised the Warren Police Department for the work it is doing and stressed the value of increased community policing.

Warren City Council at-large candidate Gary Boike, a retired Hamtramck police officer, praised the Warren Police Department for the work it is doing and stressed the value of increased community policing.

Photo by Brian Louwers


Boike: ‘I’ll prove that I’m worth the position’

By: Brian Louwers | Warren Weekly | Published October 9, 2019

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WARREN — Gary Boike learned a lot about law enforcement over his 25-year career with the Hamtramck Police Department.

He was born and raised there but has called Warren home for about 30 years. As a resident and a taxpayer now working as a contract manager overseeing security at federal courthouses in Michigan, Tennessee, Kentucky and Ohio, he’s still concerned about public safety and policing.

“I’ve been a public servant for 45 years, and I’m still taking care of the public,” Boike said.

He ran for a seat on the Macomb County Board of Commissioners in 2016, has served on Warren’s Zoning Board of Appeals for the last two and a half years, and said he decided to run for an at-large position on the City Council as a way of “giving back” by sharing all he’s learned over his career.

“I want to increase the Police Department,” Boike said, adding that the people he’s met over the course of his campaign have looked favorably on his law enforcement background.

“For the personnel they have — and they’ve been downsized for the last 10 years, going down, and just recently they’ve been adding police officers — for what they have, they’ve been doing a tremendous job,” Boike said. “Constantly I see prosecutions, making arrests.”

He credited the Police Department and its leadership for its work on task force operations targeting car thieves and drug dealers, and said manpower at the department is likely stretched thin by investigations that require work with other departments to catch people who commit crimes in Warren but don’t live in the city.

He said what he doesn’t see as much of these days are routine neighborhood patrols.  

“When I moved here 30 years ago, my son would be playing in front of the house, a police officer would stop and talk to him. They’d come through the neighborhood. They’d talk to the children. They’d talk to the neighbors. We don’t have that no more,” Boike said. “Very seldom do I see officers patrolling the area unless they’re dispatched for a call. We need community policing back in the neighborhoods, and the information you develop in the neighborhoods is very useful to police investigations.”

Boike credited the job done by the city’s Fire Department, tasked with emergency medical transport, and said he’d also like to see increased numbers of personnel there.

Addressing stormwater flooding is another main area of concern he said people have expressed during the campaign.

“A lot of people ask what my platform is. I always tell them, ‘I can’t promise you that,’ but what I can promise them is you’ll hear my voice fight for that,” Boike said.

He added that some people consider him an underdog in the council race, but he doesn’t see it that way.

“Give me that chance to win. I’ll prove that I’m worth the position,” Boike said.

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