Authorities remove 43 dogs from site in Roseville

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published March 26, 2019

 The animals removed from a garage and home in Roseville and a house in West Bloomfield, such as Drew, pictured, are now in the care of local animal shelters after an investigation by animal control and the police.

The animals removed from a garage and home in Roseville and a house in West Bloomfield, such as Drew, pictured, are now in the care of local animal shelters after an investigation by animal control and the police.

Photo provided by William Mullan

 Forty-three dogs  in Roseville and nine in West Bloomfield, such as Chunky, pictured, were removed by authorities  following concern over the animals’ well-being while in the care of a woman who said she was running  an animal shelter.

Forty-three dogs in Roseville and nine in West Bloomfield, such as Chunky, pictured, were removed by authorities following concern over the animals’ well-being while in the care of a woman who said she was running an animal shelter.

Photo provided by William Mullan

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ROSEVILLE — Forty-three dogs were recovered by the Roseville Police Department and Macomb County Animal Control from a garage in Roseville due to what authorities believed were unhealthy and unsanitary conditions.

The two agencies took action at approximately 11 a.m. March 16 following a call from a passer-by reporting concern for the animals. The garage was located on the property of the Aaron Moishe Cemetery located at the corner of Little Mack Avenue and Masonic Boulevard.

Police said the person who was in control of the animals is a 51-year-old woman residing in the home adjacent to the garage. Investigators located 33 dogs in various cages in the garage and an additional 10 dogs within the home, according to Roseville police. The responding officers reportedly determined that the sanitary conditions of the animals warranted immediate attention.

Macomb County Animal Control concurred with the assessment and made arrangements to house the animals with other groups.

A second home on Hauser Way in West Bloomfield, near Farmington and Walnut Lake roads, where the woman in question was believed by investigators to reside, also was investigated. The Oakland County Animal Shelter and Pet Adoption Center removed nine more dogs from that location.

“We did take possession of nine dogs from West Bloomfield,” said Bob Gatt, the​ Oakland County Animal Shelter and Pet Adoption Center division manager. “The home the animals were in had some issues — such as mold problems and water leaks — which made the house unsafe for the animals. As far as the animals themselves, they were in crates and there was no problem with their well-being. The owner surrendered ownership of the animal over to us.”

Police said the woman claimed to be running an animal shelter in Oakland County. Detectives stated that it appeared the Roseville location was being used as a temporary site while she secured different arrangements for the animals, but police added that there was no indication she had applied for a license in Roseville to operate such a facility. 

“The account we got initially was that she was running a kennel in Oakland County, and for whatever reason, she had to move the animals to the Roseville location,” said Roseville Deputy Chief Donald Glandon. “She’ll be issued a local ordinance violation for not having a kennel license, which you need if you have more than three animals.” 

State law does not require a license to operate an animal rescue; however, several local ordinances, such as those in Roseville, do place certain stipulations about what kinds of animals can be kept on certain properties.

“Right now, we consider it closed with the citation,” Glandon said. “There was no indication we should view this as an animal cruelty issue. The animals are with the Macomb County Animal Shelter and their assisting organizations. Whether the animals are returned may end up needing to be determined by the court.”

“We have the animals here, and our veterinary staff are giving them each a very thorough examination,” said Gatt. “We want to make sure there was no abuse or neglect in this matter. It’s too early to say what will happen to the animals. Our investigation is not complete yet. If there was no criminal activity involved, they would be available for adoption.”

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