The Shelby Township Library started a golden ticket promotion on April 9 for National Library Week where patrons can find a golden ticket and exchange it for a prize. Tickets can be found and redeemed through June 11.

The Shelby Township Library started a golden ticket promotion on April 9 for National Library Week where patrons can find a golden ticket and exchange it for a prize. Tickets can be found and redeemed through June 11.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Shelby library hides 100 golden tickets redeemable for prizes

By: Joshua Gordon | Shelby - Utica News | Published April 16, 2018

 Shelby Township Library Director Katie Ester, left, and circulation clerk Erin Luenz, right, hold up examples of prizes that can be won with a golden ticket, including a canvas bag, a beach ball and a journal.

Shelby Township Library Director Katie Ester, left, and circulation clerk Erin Luenz, right, hold up examples of prizes that can be won with a golden ticket, including a canvas bag, a beach ball and a journal.

Photo by Deb Jacques

SHELBY TOWNSHIP — When Charlie Bucket found a golden ticket wrapped around a chocolate bar, it earned him a trip to the mysterious candy factory run by Willy Wonka in Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.”

Shelby Township Library patrons won’t get a chance to run a large candy factory, but the lucky ones who find golden tickets hidden around the library will get rewarded with library-themed prizes.

The golden ticket promotion is part of National Library Week, which took place April 8-14, but library patrons will have until June 11 to find and exchange a golden ticket for a prize. Library Director Katie Ester said they made and hid 100 golden tickets.

“We wanted to do something fun to attract people in to get a library card or use the library as a show of appreciation for our community,” Ester said. “People here do use their hometown library and make it a part of the community.”

Ester said she had seen people discussing golden ticket promotions online as events that organizations could use to promote community involvement. So she took prizes that were left over from last summer’s reading program and expanded the prize pool with new library-themed gifts.

She didn’t want to give away all the potential prizes, but Ester said prizes include a 3-in-1 book light, a canvas bag with the Shelby Township Library logo on it, beach balls for kids, and journals that have a spot for a library card.

Circulation clerk Sheri Gulla designed the golden tickets and said she wanted to make them look like real golden tickets, so the library ordered special printable foil paper to cover the front and back of the paper.

The tickets congratulate the person who found it and tell them to redeem it for a prize by the deadline. The tickets also have the library’s address on them. Gulla said she hopes the promotion gets people to check out new areas of the library.

“I think this could encourage both adults and children to explore different parts of the library that they don’t normally explore,” she said.

Ester said they have already had a handful of tickets found, and some people have been confused as to what they are for, and others have tried to turn them in as lost property.

Some of the hiding spots where tickets have already been found include under a keyboard at one of the library’s computers, in a children’s book, on a reading chair and in the copier on April 9, the first morning of the promotion.

The library also held several other events throughout the week to celebrate National Library Week, including a celebratory cake on April 10 and a scavenger hunt on April 14.

Ester said having events welcoming people to the library for different reasons allows the library to be a third space in the community outside of home and work. By allowing the golden tickets to be found and redeemed through June, Ester said she hopes to continue the conversation of great things happening at the library.

“These give us a chance to talk to people who found them about how they use the library, why they came to the library and how they found the ticket,” she said. “We have people coming in and talking with strangers and working to find these tickets. That shows that a well-funded and well-stocked library can be the beating heart in our community.”