Officer Lamar Kashat, who is part of the Sterling Heights Police Department’s Community Outreach and Engagement program, prepares to hit the road Jan. 18 at the beginning of his shift.

Officer Lamar Kashat, who is part of the Sterling Heights Police Department’s Community Outreach and Engagement program, prepares to hit the road Jan. 18 at the beginning of his shift.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Police outreach program rolls out video series

By: Eric Czarnik | Sterling Heights Sentry | Published January 23, 2018

 One of the CORE program’s objectives is to inform the public about how to keep children safe.

One of the CORE program’s objectives is to inform the public about how to keep children safe.

Photo by Deb Jacques

The Sterling Heights Police Department is hoping to reach a new core audience through a video outreach program.

During a Jan. 16 Sterling Heights City Council meeting, City Manager Mark Vanderpool described a new activity that some Sterling Heights police officers are taking on.

The Police Department’s Community Outreach and Engagement program, or CORE, is starting a video series called CORE Connect. People can watch the video series on Sterling Heights Television and online, Vanderpool said.

He said the videos are being produced by Sterling Heights Television, and they will provide helpful information, safety suggestions and crime avoidance tips.

“So we’ll have a number of these video snippets throughout the year, and we’ll be pushing this out, as I mentioned, through all of our social media,” Vanderpool said.

For the video series’ first episode, Officer Lamar Kashat discusses a phone scam that police believe will grow more prevalent as tax season approaches.

 “The solicitor will often call your home or cellphone number (and) provide you with your name, address, phone number and date of birth. They will then advise you that you have unpaid taxes and will demand payment by three ways,” he explained.

According to Kashat, the scammer often will threaten to have a police officer sent to arrest the victim unless the victim transfers money in various ways to the scammer. He said the scams generally target the elderly and young people from 18 to 22 years old.

“If you receive any types of these phone calls, hang up and notify law enforcement,” Kashat said. “The Sterling Heights Police Department urges you to stay vigilant and notify your family and friends.”

Vanderpool said CORE is a joint venture between the Police Department and the city’s Community Relations Department. The CORE program was rolled out in 2017, with six officers each being assigned their own district in the city to serve as a liaison and to foster closer ties between neighborhoods and police.

For instance, through CORE, police used an interpreter to inform Arabic-speaking residents about crime and police issues in the fall, according to Sterling Heights Police Chief Dale Dwojakowski.

Find out more about the Sterling Heights Community Outreach and Engagement program by visiting www.sterling-heights.net/core.