A new year brings in new cars at auto show

By: Eric Czarnik, | Sterling Heights Sentry | Published December 21, 2015 | Updated January 4, 2016 9:46am

The start of a new year signals the green light for the start of a new season at the North American International Auto Show in downtown Detroit.

The auto show season will start Jan. 9 with an event at MGM Grand Detroit called “The Gallery.” Then the media will be invited Jan. 11-12 to tour the exhibits at Cobo Center. 

Industry professionals will convene Jan. 13-14 for their own preview, and a charity preview will take place Jan. 15. Finally, the general public is invited to personally see the displays Jan. 16-24. 

According to a statement from 2016 NAIAS Chairman Paul Sabatini, this year’s auto show is about Detroit remaining in the driver’s seat as the next generation of technology and products get ready to launch.

“From muscle and electric cars, to high-performance supercars and full-size trucks, NAIAS has something for everyone to enjoy,” he said.

Auto show public relations manager Max Muncey said an estimated 800,000 people attended the 2015 auto show, adding that attendance is largely dependent on weather. 

In addition, last year’s auto show brought in around $400 million of regional economic activity, and Muncey said organizers expect the show to encourage people to spend around $425 million into sectors like restaurants, hotels and more.

Many auto companies tend to be tight-lipped about what sort of new vehicles will make appearances. But the last show introduced 55 vehicles, and this year should also have plenty of news-breaking announcements too.

In addition, auto show visitors may expect to see lots of new sights besides the cars — the automakers and suppliers have collectively spent around $200 million in new exhibits with a major focus on interactive displays, Muncey said.

“About 70 percent of the actual show floor plan is brand new this year,” he explained. “People can expect to see automakers in a different configuration and layout on the showroom floor. The automakers are showing a long-term commitment to the show.”

As an offshoot of an auto show theme, “All Roads Lead to Detroit,” three classic cars will make an 11-day, 2,400-mile journey from the Lemay-America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, Washington to Detroit for the show, Muncey said. 

The cars are a 1966 Ford Mustang, a 1961 Chrysler 300G and a 1957 Chevrolet Nomad, Muncey said.

“These classic cars will be on display at the show for people to come see them,” he added.

The North American International Auto Show will open to the public Jan. 16-24 at Cobo Center, 1 Washington Blvd., in Detroit. Individual general admission tickets cost $13 per adult, $7 per senior ages 65 and older, $7 per child ages 7-12 and free for children 6 and younger who attend with a parent or guardian. Discounted tickets for groups of 30 or more may also be available.

Learn more by visiting www.naias.com.The start of a new year signals the green light for the start of a new season at the North American International Auto Show in downtown Detroit.

The auto show season will start Jan. 9 with an event at MGM Grand Detroit called “The Gallery.” Then the media will be invited Jan. 11-12 to tour the exhibits at Cobo Center. 

Industry professionals will convene Jan. 13-14 for their own preview, and a charity preview will take place Jan. 15. Finally, the general public is invited to personally see the displays Jan. 16-24. 

According to a statement from 2016 NAIAS Chairman Paul Sabatini, this year’s auto show is about Detroit remaining in the driver’s seat as the next generation of technology and products get ready to launch.

“From muscle and electric cars, to high-performance supercars and full-size trucks, NAIAS has something for everyone to enjoy,” he said.

Auto show public relations manager Max Muncey said an estimated 800,000 people attended the 2015 auto show, adding that attendance is largely dependent on weather. 

In addition, last year’s auto show brought in around $400 million of regional economic activity, and Muncey said organizers expect the show to encourage people to spend around $425 million into sectors like restaurants, hotels and more.

Many auto companies tend to be tight-lipped about what sort of new vehicles will make appearances. But the last show introduced 55 vehicles, and this year should also have plenty of news-breaking announcements too.

In addition, auto show visitors may expect to see lots of new sights besides the cars — the automakers and suppliers have collectively spent around $200 million in new exhibits with a major focus on interactive displays, Muncey said.

“About 70 percent of the actual show floor plan is brand new this year,” he explained. “People can expect to see automakers in a different configuration and layout on the showroom floor. The automakers are showing a long-term commitment to the show.”

As an offshoot of an auto show theme, “All Roads Lead to Detroit,” three classic cars will make an 11-day, 2,400-mile journey from the Lemay-America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, Washington to Detroit for the show, Muncey said. 

The cars are a 1966 Ford Mustang, a 1961 Chrysler 300G and a 1957 Chevrolet Nomad, Muncey said.

“These classic cars will be on display at the show for people to come see them,” he added.

The North American International Auto Show will open to the public Jan. 16-24 at Cobo Center, 1 Washington Blvd., in Detroit. Individual general admission tickets cost $13 per adult, $7 per senior ages 65 and older, $7 per child ages 7-12 and free for children 6 and younger who attend with a parent or guardian. Discounted tickets for groups of 30 or more may also be available.

Learn more by visiting www.naias.com.