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May 16, 2014

Loftis conference adjourned, next court date in June

By Kevin Bunch
C & G Staff Writer

ROSEVILLE — Michael Loftis, the man accused of the kidnapping and rape of a 62-year-old Roseville woman in 1998, has his next district court date set for June 4 following the adjournment of his pre-exam conference May 14.

Prosecutor Michael Servitto said the case is still coming together and the defense needs more time to get all the information that has thus far been compiled.

“We have new discovery to provide to the defense. We still have witnesses to interview. There was an interview done by Roseville police of the defendant that has not yet been provided to defense,” Servitto said. “We have no objections to adjournment.”

Court-appointed defense attorney Thomas Tomko said that he would need at least two additional weeks to go over all the relevant information and discuss it with his client. Loftis himself had no objections.

Loftis is due back at the 39th District Court at 10 a.m. June 4, and Judge Joseph Boedecker said that if it runs long, they could pick it back up in the afternoon.

Roseville police arrested Loftis, 44, of Clinton Township, May 7 and the Macomb County Prosecutor’s Office charged Loftis with one count of criminal sexual conduct, one count of kidnapping, and one count of unlawful imprisonment. If he is convicted, he could face up to life in prison.

Police Chief James Berlin told the Eastsider May 7 that Loftis allegedly approached and attempted to rob the Roseville woman in July of 1998 as she was leaving a bingo game at the Sacred Heart Church Festival.

“She didn’t have any money,” Berlin said. “For whatever reason, he (allegedly) kidnapped and assaulted her.”

County Prosecutor Eric Smith alleged that Loftis then forced the woman into her car, took her to a liquor store parking lot near 12 Mile Road and I-94, and assaulted her.

He was on the sex offender registry stemming from a similar incident around 1994, according to Berlin, but at the time, Michigan did not require DNA samples for the database. When Loftis went to California last year, however, state laws there required that he submit a DNA sample, which led to law enforcement finding a match to samples recovered from the 1998 incident.

Tomko had no comment on the case at this time.

You can reach C & G Staff Writer Kevin Bunch at kbunch@candgnews.com or at (586)498-1030.