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Bloomfield Hills

July 16, 2013

County launches Pure Oakland Water

Cranbrook hosts family-friendly reception for new county nonprofit

By Tiffany Esshaki
C & G Staff Writer

BLOOMFIELD HILLS — Next week, the dinosaurs that reside at the Cranbrook Institute of Science will play host to guests from across Oakland County who will come to celebrate the launch of Pure Oakland Water.

The new nonprofit was formed earlier this year, with the help of Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner Jim Nash and others who are concerned about protecting the county’s natural water resources. According to a statement from Nash’s office, POW will look to educate the public and organize residents and volunteers to advocate for and improve the region’s water supply, including Michigan lakes, rivers and streams, for a sustainable future.

According to Alyssa Atkinson, an intern for Nash’s office and organizer for the event, guests who attend the family-friendly July 25 fundraiser at Cranbrook will be treated to a reception-style meet-and-greet with hors d’oeuvres, dessert and a cash bar, as well as the special treat of having free rein of the science museum for the evening.

Cranbrook recently opened a special new exhibit titled “Dinosaurs: The Lost World,” offering guests a unique look back in time to when dinosaurs ruled the earth. According to Cranbrook Institute of Science Director Dr. Michael Stafford, the new exhibition is just one reason he wanted to open the museum doors to Nash and his guests from across Oakland County.

“We want people to meet Jim Nash and for the guests to experience the Cranbrook Institute of Science and learn a little bit about what we’re doing, as well as the good work Jim and his office are up to,” said Stafford. “Also, to learn about what the opportunities there are to … promote fresh water in Michigan.”

Atkinson said that though POW has only been around for a few months, members have already reached out to residents several times through community events, town hall meetings and school programs, including a water festival at Oakland University earlier this spring that welcomed thousands of fifth-graders from around the county to the campus.

The July 25 fundraiser, she added, is more of a reception than a true effort to raise money. In August, POW will host a golf outing, and later there will be more initiatives to raise money for the cause. The idea of the museum reception is just to introduce local families to the organization and drum up support for POW’s future projects.

“If we raise any money at all, we’ll consider that a success. We just want to get people to come and learn about the nonprofit so if they chose to donate in the future, they’ll know who we are and what we do,” said Atkinson.

Stafford agreed, saying the evening will be a fun meet-and-greet to introduce neighbors to Nash, his staff, and maybe a couple extinct reptiles while they’re at it.

“We’re of the same mind, for lack of a better way to put it. And if we can help (Nash) be successful in helping to support the education of K-12 kids about fresh water in Oakland County, we’ll bring our assets to bear.”

“An Evening at Cranbrook with Jim Nash” will be held 5:30-7:30 p.m. July 25 at the Cranbrook Institute of Science. Tickets are $60 per person and can be purchased in advance or at the door. Children 10 and younger are admitted at no cost.

For more information, contact Atkinson at (248) 858-0663 or atkinsonaa@oakgov.com.

The Cranbrook Institute of Science is located at 39221 Woodward Ave. in Bloomfield Hills.

You can reach C & G Staff Writer Tiffany Esshaki at tesshaki@candgnews.com or at (586)498-1095.