Though COVID-19 forced the cancellation of Dream Cruise events in cities all along Woodward Avenue, classic and unique car owners still found themselves on the roadway Aug. 15 to celebrate the 26th anniversary of the event.

Though COVID-19 forced the cancellation of Dream Cruise events in cities all along Woodward Avenue, classic and unique car owners still found themselves on the roadway Aug. 15 to celebrate the 26th anniversary of the event.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Woodward Avenue sees drivers day of Dream Cruise, but not like years past

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published August 25, 2020

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FERNDALE — Saturday, Aug. 15, marked what was supposed to be the 26th annual Woodward Dream Cruise. Instead, the thousands of classic vehicles that usually populated Woodward Avenue in years past diminished greatly in number.

The Dream Cruise normally would bring in people from neighboring cities and out of state to the area to celebrate cruising and classic cars. While the Dream Cruise didn’t take place this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, there still were Mustangs, Corvettes and Camaros rolling down the road from downtown Ferndale to Pontiac.

Jerry Naumann was one of those drivers who still participated in the annual tradition this year, taking vehicles including his Plymouth Prowler and his custom upside-down GMC Rally van out on the road every day, Wednesday to Saturday.

Naumann, a Berkley resident, said he always was going to drive out on Woodward, regardless of whether or not there was an event.

“I love going out there every year,” he said. “It’s been in my blood before I was even born.”

On a typical Dream Cruise Saturday, Naumann finds himself helping out the local American Legion that he’s a part of to raise money for veterans. As there were no local events this year with the shutdown, he was able to go out and drive his different vehicles around.

While Woodward still had drivers taking their vintage vehicles out on the road Aug. 15, it wasn’t as crowded as it typically would be during a normal year. That was something Naumann actually liked better about driving the road this year.

“It seemed easier to cruise on the road,” he said. “It wasn’t packed with a lot of people from out of state.”

Pleasant Ridge resident Fred McCoy also found himself on Woodward that Saturday. He took his 1973 Oldsmobile Cutlass Salon for a drive all the way to Pontiac and back.

McCoy also noticed that Woodward wasn’t crowded this year. He said it was a nice drive, but he didn’t find that many cruisers during his drive early that morning.

“Not too much to see,” he said. “Not a lot of stuff parked along the road like there always usually is. A few now and then, but nothing like that it usually is. And that’s fine. That’s what it should be, because it’s too dangerous for people to gather. So hopefully we’ll have better things next year.”

McCoy later that day would walk to Woodward from his house, but he didn’t see much of anything on the street.

“It’s just gone this year, but what can you do?” he said.

“I don’t think I felt like I was missing out on something, because there was nothing to miss out on. I guess you felt this kind of regret and sadness that a usually great event couldn’t happen this year, and that’s a shame,” he said.

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