Westbound traffic along the north side of Nine Mile between Hoover and Van Dyke will be maintained while the project is ongoing; the eastbound lanes on the south side of the road will be closed.

Westbound traffic along the north side of Nine Mile between Hoover and Van Dyke will be maintained while the project is ongoing; the eastbound lanes on the south side of the road will be closed.

Photo by Brian Louwers


Section of eastbound Nine Mile to close for nine months

By: Brian Louwers | Warren Weekly | Published October 23, 2020

Advertisement

WARREN — Warren officials say an investment of $80 million and a good chunk of patience will eventually reduce the risk of basement flooding and help protect local waterways.

A section of eastbound Nine Mile Road between Hoover Road and Van Dyke Avenue was scheduled to close for nine months starting Oct. 26 for continued construction related to the city’s massive relief sewer and force main installation project.

“There will be tunneling going on underneath there,” said Bryan Clor, division head of the city of Warren’s Water Recovery Facility. “It will be nine months. What we have written in is summer 2021. Hopefully, they will go faster.”

Westbound traffic along the north side of Nine Mile between Hoover and Van Dyke will be maintained while the project is ongoing, while the eastbound lanes on the south side of the road will be closed.  

The price of the relief sewer section is budgeted at $22 million, and the entire project, budgeted at $80 million, will be done in phases. Clor said underground construction of the 48-inch relief sewer and a 48-inch force main is the first phase. The force main is engineered to put the flow of contaminated water under pressure and move it more effectively through the system. The second phase involves the reconstruction of the city’s Nine Mile pump station. Phase three is the construction of a new 22-million-gallon detention basin at the former Roosevelt Elementary School property on Stephens Road, east of the intersection of Schoenherr Road and Groesbeck Highway.

Clor said the upgrades and new construction, when completed, were designed to handle a “25-year storm.”

“It’s to substantially reduce basement flooding and sanitary sewer overflows into the Red Run during rain events,” Clor said.

Warren Mayor Jim Fouts said protecting properties from basement flooding means improved quality of life for residents.

“No other city in the immediate metro area has done anything regarding building a detention basin to give people relief from flooded basements,” Fouts said.

Advertisement