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 Nicole Paille, of Roseville, sits in her new car for the first time. It was donated to her through the Recycled Rides program after the mother of four lost her previous car in an accident.

Nicole Paille, of Roseville, sits in her new car for the first time. It was donated to her through the Recycled Rides program after the mother of four lost her previous car in an accident.

Photo by Brendan Losinski


Local business donates car to resident in need

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published March 20, 2020

 The owners of Butler’s Collision in Roseville and representatives of Farmers Insurance show Roseville resident Nicole Paille her new 2014 Nissan Altima that they donated to her through the Recycled Rides program.

The owners of Butler’s Collision in Roseville and representatives of Farmers Insurance show Roseville resident Nicole Paille her new 2014 Nissan Altima that they donated to her through the Recycled Rides program.

Photos by Brendan Losinski

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ROSEVILLE — The loss of a car can be devastating, especially for low-income families.

Without a means of transportation, getting to work, getting kids to school, going to the grocery store and other necessities can be difficult at best. Butler’s Collision in Roseville recently stepped in to help one local resident and her family by donating a car to her.

“We’re in a program called Recycled Rides, which is a national program, which was designed to reach out to local communities and help meet the needs of transportation that some people have,” said Roy Schnepper, the owner of Butler’s Collision. “The insurance company, Farmers Insurance in this case, provides us with a wrecked vehicle that they had, and we contact local vendors to help get parts at either no-cost or low-cost, and we repair the car. We then find a recipient who is in need and give them a car that looks brand-new and will provide them with long-lasting transportation.”

Recycled Rides is put on by the National Auto Body Council, a collision industry trade association representing all facets of the industry. Their mission is to develop, implement and promote community-based initiatives that show the professionalism of the industry within local communities. The NABC has given away more than 2,500 cars since 2007 through Recycled Rides.

“There’s a qualification program,” Schnepper explained. “They need to be able to pay for insurance, have a clean driving record and can put gas in the vehicle and have a job. We reached out and looked around Macomb County, because we wanted to make sure someone from Macomb County was receiving the vehicle. We found Compassion Pregnancy, who said they had someone who would be a perfect fit. I called them, and one of their own people just had an accident who had no way to get to work beyond taking the bus or hiring an Uber or something, so the door was flung wide open to vet that person.”

The car went to Roseville resident Nicole Paille, who works at Compassion Pregnancy in Clinton Township. Paille had been struggling since she lost her car in the auto accident several weeks before.

“It felt so good to find out about this,” she remarked. “The Compassion Pregnancy director called me a few weeks after the accident and told me I would be getting the car, and I broke down crying,” she said. “I want to thank everyone who was involved in this and send appreciation to everybody who helped make this happen for me and my family.”

Paille was on her way to work when she was in the car accident.

“I was involved with Compassion Pregnancy for some time,” she said. “They helped me in the past few years, since I have four children under the age of 5. They gave me counselling, buying diapers and home services. One day I was supposed to go speak for them, and I was in an accident with a Dodge Durango on the way. The supervisor recommended me here.”

She said that the loss of a vehicle can be devastating for a working parent.

“It allows me to do my work and get to my kids’ school more efficiently, and get to doctors appointments and so forth,” Paille said. “It makes things so much easier when you have four kids (who) you have to pack up and try and take on the bus. This was a wonderful opportunity.”

“This lady is a mom of four kids,” added Schnepper. “Without transportation, she can’t get the kids to school properly, get to the grocery store or get to work. It’s more difficult to even get to places like the doctor. Having a mode of transportation is very important to people.”

The vehicle was donated by Farmers Insurance, which works regularly with Butler’s Collision.

“It’s a 2014 Nissan Altima that was donated to us by a customer who had a claim on it. Normally, it would just go to auction, but this way we can give it directly to someone who needs it,” said Nicholas Maluchnik, an auto claims representative at Farmers Insurance. “We’re committed to serving communities where our customers, our employees and our agents live and work.” 

Schnepper said it was good to be able to help a member of the community in such a tangible way.

“We want to give back to our community,” he said. “God has blessed us in many ways. We see many needs out there, and this is an opportunity for us to meet those needs. Sometimes they say you need to be able to give, whether it’s to a nonprofit or a local church, but this is a physical need that we can provide.”

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