Southfield High softball stocked with seniors

By: Christian Davis | Southfield Sun | Published May 4, 2011

 Southfield High senior Jarrielle Scarbrough takes a swing against Harper Woods High April 29 at Harper Woods. The Blue Jays fell 10-2.

Southfield High senior Jarrielle Scarbrough takes a swing against Harper Woods High April 29 at Harper Woods. The Blue Jays fell 10-2.

Photo by Erin Sanchez

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HARPER WOODS — Southfield High softball coach Jamie Glinz has witnessed the change.

Now in his fourth season coaching the Blue Jays, he’s seen the program go from winning one game the year before he took over to a squad that is in every contest it plays.

“It’s definitely a lot better situation than it was three years ago,” he said as the Blue Jays prepared to take on Harper Woods High April 29. “When I took over, and we were losing and being mercied; that was hard to handle. I don’t mind losing if we are competitive. We shouldn’t be mercied by any team now, which we haven’t been.”

The Blue Jays were 1-4 at press time but had been in every contest. With the return of seven starters and six seniors on the roster, Glinz and his players believe they are in line to battle for the Oakland Activities Association Gold Division title.

“I think us, (Southfield)-Lathrup and (Bloomfield Hills) Andover are vying for that top spot,” he said.

For it to happen, Glinz is counting on seniors Amanda Love, Kristal Woodard and Leslie Summerville.

Love and Summerville rotate in the circle, while Woodard is a fixture behind the plate.

“They finally have their groove with pitching, and Kristal has been throwing girls out at second and not letting up many past balls,” Glinz said. “That’s definitely one of our strengths. That and their leadership.”

Love and Woodard agreed that the actions of the seniors will make or break the season.

“It’s our last year, so we want to go out with a bang,” Love said. “We’re trying to do something we’ve never done before. All the seniors’ mindsets are pretty strong on winning.

“During our games, we push everyone and say, ‘This is our last year, so go out and look like a senior.’”

Love and Woodard have seen the steady rise in the program. Love is a four-year varsity member, while Woodard is a three-year veteran.

Woodard knows that the team may be overlooked by some opponents, and that is fine with her.

“It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog,” she said. “That’s kind of like us. We’re small, but we have a big bite.”

 

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