North Farmington boys hoops coach stepping down

By: Christian Davis | Farmington Press | Published April 5, 2011

 North Farmington boys basketball coach Tom Negoshian speaks with his team in a game this past season. The veteran is retiring after 25 years with the program.

North Farmington boys basketball coach Tom Negoshian speaks with his team in a game this past season. The veteran is retiring after 25 years with the program.

File photo by Deb Jacques

Advertisement

As a young, aspiring coach, Tom Negoshian visited his old basketball coach, Ralph Grubb, for some advice.

Negoshian — who has led the North Farmington boys basketball program for 25 years — asked the veteran why he had coached so long and what does he enjoy about it.

“Right then, a kid walked by him and I in the hallway and said, ‘Hey coach,’” Negoshian remembered.

“And (Grubb) said, ‘That says it all right there, Tom, because you make such a difference, and there’s such a smile on a kid’s face when they say coach. It’s an unbelievable word.’”

For more than 40 years since that conversation, the word “coach” has been a prefix to Negoshian’s name.

Now a veteran himself, he’s retiring.

“I’ve been coaching for over 40 years. I just felt like I still enjoy practice, everything else, but I just felt like it’s time for a change,” he said.

“I’m a firm believer that sometimes you can stay too long, and I never wanted to do that, and I felt like it was getting to that point.”

Negoshian said he almost retired a year ago, but made the decision to give it one more go around last summer.

The coach said it was an easy choice at first, but as the final games rolled on, it became clear what he was giving up.

“Whenever you’re a coach, you are always worried about the next game, the next practice, the next group of kids,” he said. “You never really take the time and reflect the way you should.

“I think, as I went through the year, it made me reflect on how fortunate I was for what I was able to do. It made me say, ‘God, I’m going to miss this — being in the gym with the guys, the tough times and good times.’”

Negoshian finished his career with more than 300 wins, and the Raiders were 13-10 in his final season.

He hasn’t ruled out coaching in some capacity, and his sons, Todd and Ryan, are both coaches at the prep level.

“So maybe I could end up being an assistant somewhere or come in and help out once in a- while,” he said.

But Negoshian does believe his head coaching days are behind him, though, he won’t ever be far from the game.

He’s an analyst for Web and radio broadcasts for Oakland University men’s basketball, and he plans on still attending prep games.

“I’m going to spend some time visiting friends in the business that I haven’t had a chance to before. Then go around and second-guess some coaches the way I’ve been second-guessed for 40 years,” he said with a laugh. “That’s just part of the business.”

Advertisement