Wattles closes between Beach and Adams

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published January 26, 2016

 Ron Roby, project manager with Angelo Iafrate Construction, checks out the work on Chestnut Hill Court, just off of Wattles, where the tunneling begins, Jan. 22.

Ron Roby, project manager with Angelo Iafrate Construction, checks out the work on Chestnut Hill Court, just off of Wattles, where the tunneling begins, Jan. 22.

Photo by Donna Dalziel

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Those who travel Wattles Road on the far west side of the city will have to find a different route until this spring as work begins on a sanitary sewer.

Wattles Road between Beach and Adams roads is closed, and Chestnut Hill Court, south of Wattles Road, will also be closed for work on the North Evergreen Interceptor, part of the Evergreen-Farmington sanitary disposal system. Residents on those roads will have access to their homes from Adams Road and will be contacted in advance when driveway closures are scheduled.

Tim Richnak, director of public works for the city of Troy, said the roads closed Jan. 4 and will remain closed until 3,500 feet of 60-inch sewer pipe is installed. The project is expected to be finished by the end of May.

Wattles is also closed between Kirkcaldy and Burnley in Bloomfield Township for installation of a smaller-diameter pipe to connect to the existing interceptor.

The recommended detours for eastbound and westbound drivers are Long Lake and Squirrel Road. For northbound and southbound traffic, it’s Coolidge Highway.

The Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office is managing the project, which will fix hydraulic inefficiency and pipe capacity issues that increase the risk of sanitary sewer overflows, or discharge of untreated wastewater into the Rouge River.

“This will keep things flowing at top-level capacity and keeps basements from flooding,” Richnak said.

The North Evergreen Interceptor serves portions of Auburn Hills, Bloomfield Hills, Bloomfield Township and Troy.

The city’s share of the project is about $4.5 million, which the council approved last year as part of the 2015-16 city budget.

Richnak explained that the city had been setting money aside in the capital improvement fund for a number of years in anticipation of the project.

Joel Brown, civil engineer for the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office, said the total project costs are anticipated to be  about $5.9 million.

“The balance of the total project costs is being funded by Bloomfield Township,” Brown said via email.

According to the Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner’s Office, tree removal is expected to be minimal, roads and driveways will be repaved, and landscaping will be restored.

The sewer improvement is designed to stop sanitary sewer overflows into the Rouge River. Since 2005 there have been 11 rain events during which the Troy Department of Public Works had to pump water from the interceptor into the Rouge River to prevent basements from flooding. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality requires that the pumping of sanitary sewer overflows into the Rouge River stop by the end of 2017.

The Oakland County Water Resources Commission will own and maintain the improvements as part of the county system.

“This is another example of our dedication to continued maintenance and improvement to our county infrastructure,” Jim Nash, Oakland County water resources commissioner, said in a prepared statement. “We strive to create a sustainable future to allow for continued growth and prosperity for our region.”

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