The city plans to demolish this former Taco Bell restaurant on Rochester Road, north of Big Beaver Road.

The city plans to demolish this former Taco Bell restaurant on Rochester Road, north of Big Beaver Road.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Troy City Council buys former Taco Bell site to beat blight

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published June 26, 2018

 This site on Rochester Road, north of Big Beaver Road, has stood vacant since 2000.

This site on Rochester Road, north of Big Beaver Road, has stood vacant since 2000.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

TROY — Troy City Council members decided that a land deal for a blighted parcel was an offer they couldn’t refuse June 18.

The deal came from the Oakland County Treasurer’s Office, and it concerns property that houses a defunct Taco Bell restaurant.

The council voted 6-0 at the June 18 meeting to purchase just over half an acre of foreclosed property on the west side of Rochester Road, north of Big Beaver Road, from the county. Mayor Dane Slater was absent. 

In accordance with state law, the Oakland County Treasurer’s Office offered the city the right of second refusal to acquire the foreclosed property. 

The state of Michigan was offered the first chance to purchase the parcel for the amount of the delinquent taxes, interest and penalties owed on it — estimated at about $22,655 — and refused. 

Troy City Attorney Lori Grigg Bluhm explained at the meeting that the offer allowed the city the opportunity to acquire the property, control the blight and then sell the parcel as a remnant. 

“It is something you haven’t seen in a while,” she said of the opportunity.  

The parcel has sat vacant since 2000. 

The city plans to demolish the Taco Bell building sometime after July 9, the deadline the previous owner was given to remove any property from the building. 

The council approved up to $35,000 for demolition, maintenance, utilities, and other expenditures associated with marketing and selling the property, as well as $25,655 for taxes, interest, penalties and other acquisition costs, estimated not to exceed $25,000. 

Under state law, the city would sell the parcel as a remnant, and its market value would be determined by appraisal. Any proceeds from the sale are required, by law, to be returned to the Oakland County treasurer, minus the acquisition, demolition, maintenance and administrative costs. 

“Probably the third or fourth most asked question in the city of Troy is, when is somebody going to do something with that piece of property?” said Councilman Dave Henderson. “Finally, we can get it within our control and do the right thing and make it presentable and sell it.” 

“It will be a huge improvement to the area and making Rochester Road a much more beautiful place,” said Mayor Pro Tem Edna Abrahim.