Kulin Oak, then a sophomore at Troy High, and Troy Historical Museum volunteer Nate Brown create a Hawaiian vacation scarecrow at the Scarecrow Workshop in September 2016.

Kulin Oak, then a sophomore at Troy High, and Troy Historical Museum volunteer Nate Brown create a Hawaiian vacation scarecrow at the Scarecrow Workshop in September 2016.

File photo by Patricia O’Blenes


There’s room to crow on Scarecrow Row

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published September 5, 2018

 This group puts the finishing touches on its clown scarecrow.

This group puts the finishing touches on its clown scarecrow.

File photo by Patricia O’Blenes

TROY — This fall, the gridiron will heat up in a spot you may not expect — Scarecrow Row at the Troy Historic Village. 

Individuals, families, businesses, youth groups, clubs, Scout troops and community groups can create scarecrows to be displayed at the Troy Historic Village through the month of October. 

For the first time this year, businesses, groups and individuals can show their true colors in support of their alma mater and deck a scarecrow out in full college regalia.  

Building a college scarecrow for the event costs $200 for individuals, groups or businesses, or $250 if volunteers at the Troy Historic Village build the scarecrow with school gear provided by the group or individual. 

Individuals and families can rent a scarecrow frame to create their own scarecrow — sans sports team themes — at a cost of $10 for members of the Troy Historic Village and $15 for nonmembers. Prizes will be awarded.  

“One business wanted to do a ‘Sparty,’ and it blossomed,” said Loraine Campbell, executive director of the Troy Historic Village. 

Campbell said Scarecrow Row, in its fifth year, started as a way to bring awareness to the Troy Historic Village, and it worked. “We recognized that people up and down Livernois were slowing down to see the scarecrows,” she said. 

“None of the scarecrows are ghoulish. We display the positive, artistic side of Halloween,” Campbell explained. “We hope to draw people from the whole region. It amazes me how much fun and creative they are.” 

Troy Historical Society member JoAnn Preston helps to get the word out about Scarecrow Row sponsorships to local businesses. 

“They call me the ‘scarecrow lady,’” she said. She also serves on the team of scarecrow builders in the “field office,” the home of another volunteer who is the artistic director and is also a member of the Troy Garden Club, Debbie Hancock. 

“The first year, we had 14 businesses participate. Last year, we had 40. Kim’s (Restaurant) has been there since the beginning,” Preston said. 

She noted that 13,000 children visit the Troy Historic Village each year. “The scarecrows are a way of showing you support the museum.” 

Scarecrows must be submitted by Sept. 21 and will be displayed around the Troy Historic Village in October. They will be shared on the Troy Historic Village Facebook page for voting Oct. 5-25. The contest winner will be announced Oct. 27 at the Troy Historic Village’s annual trick-or-treat event. 

People can see the scarecrows for the first time at the Step into Autumn free open house 6-8 p.m. Sept. 28 at the Troy Historic Village. People can park on-site or at the Daisy Knight Dog Park, 3410 Livenois Road, north of Big Beaver Road, and walk, bike, skate or blade Troy’s newest trail about 2 miles to the Troy Historic Village to preview the scarecrows, watch artisans at work, enjoy live music from the guitar-mandolin duo Hot Ugly and enjoy refreshments. 

To register, visit the Troy Historic Village, fill out an entry form and pick up a wooden scarecrow frame. Visit troyhistoricvillage.org and click on Scarecrow Nation to register or for more information. 

The Troy Historic Village is located at 60 W. Wattles Road. Call (248) 524-3570 for more information.