Student design chosen for cruise logo

By: Kristyne E. Demske | St. Clair Shores Sentinel | Published November 20, 2013

 Nicole Wyrembelski, of Casco Township, created the winning logo design for the 2014 Kiwanis Harper Charity Cruise.

Nicole Wyrembelski, of Casco Township, created the winning logo design for the 2014 Kiwanis Harper Charity Cruise.

Photo by Kristyne E. Demske

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ST. CLAIR SHORES — Though the weather outside is turning frightful, thoughts are already turning to next year’s summer car cruise season with the unveiling of the 2014 logo for the Kiwanis Harper Charity Cruise.

Shorewood Kiwanis and Roy O’Brien’s Ford dealership teamed up for the third time to offer cash prizes for the top three logo designs, with the winner to be used on T-shirts sold along the cruise route to raise money for charity. The contest is held for students in the graphic design programs at Macomb Community College, which matches the cash awards with scholarships of its own for the winners.

Creating this year’s winning design was Nicole Wyrembelski, of Casco Township, a 35-year-old design and layout student at the college.

“It sounded like an exciting contest to get into,” she said.

She said she first looked for inspiration from past winners and designs, but decided to take a different path.

“I decided to go with more of a cleaner slate,” she said. “Incorporate a few classic cars and have the classic look with a modern feel to it.”

Wyrembelski took home $1,000 cash, plus a $1,000 scholarship, for her efforts. Second-place went to Kevin McCauley, who won $600 in cash and a $600 scholarship. The third place winner, with a $400 prize and matching scholarship, was Ryan Conant.

The 2014 cruise will be the first time the group uses the second-place logo, as well, said Shorewood Kiwanis Secretary Tom Ulrich. The runner-up design will be printed on volunteers’ T-shirts, and the winning design will be sold.

Ulrich said Kiwanis enjoys supporting the students’ efforts each year.

“Our whole point is kids (and) education is a big part of that,” he said. “Everything we’ve done here (at Macomb Community College) turns to gold.”

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