St. Clair Shores library has plenty of reasons to stop in this month

By: Kristyne E. Demske | St. Clair Shores Sentinel | Published March 1, 2019

 Jacob Dunn, 2, of St. Clair Shores, reads a “Curious George” book in the youth services department of the St. Clair Shores Public Library Feb. 28.

Jacob Dunn, 2, of St. Clair Shores, reads a “Curious George” book in the youth services department of the St. Clair Shores Public Library Feb. 28.

Photo by Kristyne E. Demske

 The St. Clair Shores Public Library, 22500 E. 11 Mile Road, is celebrating March Is Reading Month with a read-in, shadow hunt and guessing game.

The St. Clair Shores Public Library, 22500 E. 11 Mile Road, is celebrating March Is Reading Month with a read-in, shadow hunt and guessing game.

Photo by Kristyne E. Demske

 Shadows of familiar children’s book characters will be hidden throughout the youth services department of the library during March for patrons to find.

Shadows of familiar children’s book characters will be hidden throughout the youth services department of the library during March for patrons to find.

Photo by Kristyne E. Demske

ST. CLAIR SHORES — Begun as a way to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday, the St. Clair Shores Public Library is celebrating March Is Reading Month with a character hunt, guessing game and family reading day.

Library Director Rosemary Orlando said that the library participates in March Is Reading Month to encourage children to celebrate the joys of reading.

“The public library wants to support what’s happening in the schools, and to help the young readers and the old readers celebrate the joys of reading,” she said. “It’s to help motivate and improve the reading skills of students.”

This year, library patrons can guess how many people visited the St. Clair Shores Public Library during 2018, placing their guesses in a jar at the circulation desk each time they visit the library. In addition, they can add a gold coin to the “pot of gold” every time they check out a book during the month of March to help the library keep track.

In the youth services department, children can hunt for 10 character shadows hidden throughout the room.

“Children can come in and try to find them and receive a small prize if they find at least seven of them,” Orlando said, explaining that she hopes it will help them to “become familiar with the library, or other areas of the library that they might not go to each time.”

Capping off the month will be “Pillows and Pages,” a read-in for families from noon to 4 p.m. March 30. No registration is necessary for the event, and patrons can bring blankets and pillows to spread out on the floor and read.

“We’ll have snacks and water, but they can bring their own if they want to,” Orlando said.

Nearly 30,000 residents of the city have library cards, she said.

The library has also joined with the Suburban Library Cooperative in launching a new mobile app, available for free in the App Store and on Google Play. It allows users from a mobile device to browse the library’s catalog, place holds, renew items and look up their account information.

“Everything they can do in the library catalog, they can do on the app,” Orlando said. “It was just another way to provide easier access to our library patrons because everybody ... is doing everything on their phones.”