The city of Southfield will install speed humps on five different roads throughout the city. Only one so far has received them:  Midway Road, between Evergreen and Stahelin roads.

The city of Southfield will install speed humps on five different roads throughout the city. Only one so far has received them: Midway Road, between Evergreen and Stahelin roads.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Southfield begins installation of speed humps on local roads

‘Quite honestly, we have a problem with speeding on neighborhood streets’

By: Mike Koury | Southfield Sun | Published January 13, 2022

 Midway Road received six speed humps, all of which were made of asphalt. The other streets that will get speed humps are expected to get them in the spring.

Midway Road received six speed humps, all of which were made of asphalt. The other streets that will get speed humps are expected to get them in the spring.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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SOUTHFIELD — The city of Southfield is hoping the installation of speed humps on municipal streets will help slow down fast drivers in the neighborhoods.

A pilot program was recently approved to install speed humps on five streets throughout Southfield as a traffic calming measure. The streets were Midway Road, between Evergreen and Stahelin roads; Greenview Road, between Eight Mile and Nine Mile roads; Southwood Drive, between 10 Mile Road and Lincoln Drive; Pierce Street, north of Edwards; and Ranchwood Drive, between Winchester Street and 12 Mile Road.

The speed humps will be a mix of ones that are made of asphalt and prefabricated humps that are rubberized and screw into the roadbed.

“We’re kind of testing out different types to slow drivers in neighborhoods,” Mayor Kenson Siver said. “Quite honestly, we have a problem with speeding on neighborhood streets. Our police are out all the time issuing anywhere from 35 to 45 tickets a day, and the majority of people who receive these tickets are Southfield residents.”

City Engineer Leigh Schultz said the streets chosen were based on the number of complaints the Police Department and Siver’s office received.

“Midway happened to be high on that list and it was adjacent to a neighborhood (water main and asphalt) road project that we were doing already,” she said. “That made it easy to get it incorporated under the other neighborhood project and put them on Midway.”

“Greenview is one of those mile-long roads that is a straight shot between Eight and Nine Mile. So it gets a lot of cut-through traffic and people speeding,” Schultz continued. “So it makes it a good candidate, and I’m sure there’s lots of speeding going on on that street for just the cut-through reasons. So even though the primary point is to slow people down, some of the people speeding I’m sure are people that live right in that neighborhood, but for a road like Greenview, that’s a big cut-through street. Hopefully, that would deter some of that cut-through traffic.”

Recently, Midway received six speed humps made of asphalt. The other four streets won’t receive their humps until the spring. Greenview also will get an asphalt speed hump, while Southwood, Pierce and Ranchwood will get prefabricated humps. Schultz said the manufactured humps will probably come in January, but since adhesive is involved, they will need to wait to install them until the weather is warmer.

Siver said they were hoping to have more speed humps in by late fall, but that, unfortunately, didn’t happen.

“We intend to put these in areas where we have a high incidence of speeding,” he said. “Typically, there are neighborhood streets that are straightaways … long streets where people step on the gas and rip through the neighborhood, unfortunately.”

The speed humps are estimated to cost close to $100,000 for all the streets. The asphalt humps are estimated to cost $27,000, and the manufactured humps are estimated to be $70,000.

The city is hoping to get feedback from the public on the program, to see if it’s helping with speeding on the streets, said Schultz. She added that they had to be conscientious where driveways and cross streets were on the streets and that they worked with traffic engineers to help dictate the number and spacing.

Siver said he’s heard some negative feedback about the Midway speed humps, but he feels it’s one of those things where not everyone can be pleased.

“There are people that really want them, and several of the streets, like Greenview and Midway, we don’t have sidewalks on those streets,” he said. “I live near both of them, and I’ve seen people really go way too fast and people are walking on the shoulder of the road.”

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