Homes like this one on Common Road in Roseville are being rehabilitated via Community Development Block Grant funds aimed at restoring low-to-moderate income areas.

Homes like this one on Common Road in Roseville are being rehabilitated via Community Development Block Grant funds aimed at restoring low-to-moderate income areas.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Roseville distributes its 2019 CDBG funds of $595,000

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published April 30, 2019

 Roseville will be using its Community Development Block Grant funds on a variety of projects in 2019, including road repair, code enforcement, supporting local charitable organizations and rehabilitation of homes like this one.

Roseville will be using its Community Development Block Grant funds on a variety of projects in 2019, including road repair, code enforcement, supporting local charitable organizations and rehabilitation of homes like this one.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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ROSEVILLE — The Roseville City Council approved the distribution of its 2019 Community Development Block Grants at its regular meeting April 23.

City Manager Scott Adkins laid out the distributions of the $595,000 received from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. This includes $40,000 for various community services organizations that aid people in the Roseville community, $37,000 for code enforcement efforts, $35,000 for local economic development, $364,000 in road improvements and $119,000 for administration fees.

“Our primary focus with the bulk of these funds is used in road reconstruction in eligible areas,” Adkins said. “Sixty percent to 70% of those funds are used for that pretty much every year, including this year. We are able to utilize funding for economic development, for efforts including small business assistance, building improvements and a small grant program we’re rolling out this year to help them with building exteriors. The only key is it has to be economic development-related. 

“The next area is code enforcement, which is under our blight reduction and elimination efforts. In the past, we’ve been able to clean up sites and demolish dangerous structures. Service organizations — supporting organizations which aid low-income and underprivileged populations. This especially includes a lot of aid given to area seniors.”

Adkins added that administration fees go toward all the staff costs that make these efforts possible, a point that often gets lost in the bureaucratic language of CDBG fund distributions.

“People often blanch when they hear $119,000 for administration costs. Administration also means staffing. This means ensuring our economic development department, which administers all of these programs, (has the funds to function). These funds pay more than half of our yearly administrative costs for all of that.”

Adkins added that city officials were pleased that they were able to provide funding for a number of aid organizations within the community, including $15,000 for Chore Services, household assistance for the elderly or people with disabilities; $7,500 for St. Vincent De Paul services; $3,500 for Macomb Feeding the Need; $3,500 for the Macomb Homeless Coalition; $3,500 for the Macomb County Rotating Emergency Shelter Team; $3,000 for the Macomb Warming Shelter; $2,500 for Care House; and $1,500 for the Big Books Library. 

“All of the community groups who applied were able to be considered for their requests for funding this year, and we were able to give part of our community services allocations to all of them. Some of them didn’t get the full amount they requested, but we were able to split it up so everyone got something,” Adkins said.

The projects have to take place within, or directly affect, specific areas of the city — specifically, areas declared by HUD as low- to moderate-income areas. The city also has to operate within very specific guidelines to ensure that the money is being used to help low- to moderate-income areas. 

“There are a number of qualifications and rules laid out by HUD. They are very comprehensive,” Adkins said. “They can only be used in low- to moderate-income areas based on census data. It has to be a 51% low- to moderate-income population in an area. That limits what areas of the city we can help and the roads we can repair with this money and so forth. 

“The programs also have to meet certain goals. If you want to work on blight elimination, for instance, they have to meet national objectives. It has to be of benefit to the area served. That benefit for the relevant community has to be there. If a dangerous structure is in one of these areas, we could use CDBG money to acquire it one year and demolish it the next year.”

HUD determines which areas are eligible by breaking up the city into blocks using census data. The income level in each census block is what determines which areas qualify.

“These are all very important projects to us, and I think we’re doing everything we can to improve Roseville while staying within HUD guidelines,” said Roseville Mayor Robert Taylor. “There are limited ways we can spend these funds, but I think (these proposed projects) will make a real difference to residents.”

Adkins said he is pleased with the distribution and believes it will make a significant difference in the coming year.

“We are pleased, and I think the City Council is pleased, with how the money was distributed this year,” he said. “Priorities and needs change each year, but I think we were able to accomplish a lot while staying within the guidelines and within our local plan we submit to HUD.”

Call Staff Writer Brendan Losinski at (586) 498-1068.

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