From left, Grosse Pointe City Mayor Christopher Boettcher reads from and presents a resolution to outgoing City Councilman Andrew Turnbull during an Oct. 21 council meeting.

From left, Grosse Pointe City Mayor Christopher Boettcher reads from and presents a resolution to outgoing City Councilman Andrew Turnbull during an Oct. 21 council meeting.

Photo by K. Michelle Moran


Outgoing Grosse Pointe City councilman honored with resolution

By: K. Michelle Moran | Grosse Pointe Times | Published October 29, 2019

GROSSE POINTE CITY — When the Grosse Pointe City Council holds its next regular meeting Nov. 18, it will be without City Councilman Andrew Turnbull.

Because Turnbull and his family are currently having a new home built for them in Grosse Pointe Park, he didn’t run for reelection this year. His council colleagues thanked him for his work during his last meeting Oct. 21, and Mayor Christopher Boettcher — who’s also Turnbull’s first cousin (their moms are sisters) — presented Turnbull with a resolution of appreciation.

Turnbull, a lifelong resident of the Pointes and a licensed insurance broker, joined the council in 2011, running for an open seat in an uncontested race that November.

“Thank you,” Turnbull told fellow officials, residents and City administrators. “It’s been a pleasure serving.”

City Councilwoman Sheila Tomkowiak said Turnbull has always had “good insights” into the issues and “asks good questions.”

“I’m really going to miss Andrew,” she said.

City Councilman John Stempfle echoed that sentiment.

“Andrew, we’re really going to miss you,” he said. “You’ve provided so much insight into health matters and insurance matters.”

Turnbull became a council member at the height of the Great Recession, which started after the 2008 housing market collapse. The City, like almost every other community in Michigan, struggled financially due to a dramatic loss of property tax revenue caused by the decline in housing values; it’s a struggle Michigan municipalities are still dealing with because of state limits on property tax increases.

“We’ve done a tremendous amount of good through some turbulent times,” Turnbull said.

The resolution, which notes that Turnbull served as the council representative on the board for the City of Grosse Pointe Employees’ Retirement System, acknowledges his particular expertise. It reads, in part, that Turnbull “worked diligently with fellow Council Members to address legacy costs, and his expertise in the fields of healthcare and insurance provided valuable insight and guidance to the City through a difficult fiscal crisis created by the Great Recession.”

Boettcher acknowledged with a smile that “family and politics don’t mix,” but even though he and Turnbull didn’t always agree on every issue, they made the dual relationship work.

“We know how to stand our ground on various issues,” Boettcher said. “I want to thank (Turnbull) on taking (the council) up on that offer (to run for office) eight years ago.”

Boettcher said he’s already told Grosse Pointe Park officials that they might want to tap Turnbull for his skills when he moves there.