Final work along the I-696 service drives in Macomb County will be completed this fall, but a date has not been determined.

Final work along the I-696 service drives in Macomb County will be completed this fall, but a date has not been determined.

Photo by Brian Louwers


MDOT: Final ‘Restore the Reuther’ work nearing completion

By: Brian Louwers | C&G Newspapers | Published September 6, 2019

METRO DETROIT — There’s good news to report for anyone driving near Interstate 696.

All work associated with the Michigan Department of Transportation’s massive “Restore the Reuther” project spanning Oakland and Macomb counties is nearing completion.

According to an MDOT press release, final work along the 28-mile span, estimated at a total cost of $110 million, including remaining construction along the service drives, began in April.

“We are working toward the finish line, and it will wrap up this fall,” MDOT spokesperson Diane Cross said Sept. 5.

All freeway work in Macomb County is now complete, according to the MDOT release. Final “punch list” work will, however, continue for the next several weeks during off-peak and nighttime hours, “utilizing minimal lane closures when needed.” Remaining work completed this year included diamond grinding of the pavement, joint sealing, median crossover restoration, barrier wall repair, asphalt shoulders, median lighting restoration and a “substantial” amount of sewer repair.

Nighttime freeway work in Oakland County was expected to wrap up in early September, with a punch list schedule similar to that in Macomb County.

Final work along the I-696 service drives in Macomb County will be completed this fall, but a date has not been determined. The exact schedule will depend on the weather. According to MDOT’s release, major work on the westbound service drive will wrap up in the next two weeks, with work on the eastbound service drive ending soon thereafter. There will reportedly be intermittent lane and ramp closures put in place as needed to safely complete the work.

Warren Fire Commissioner Skip McAdams said the end of construction on and around the freeway will be welcomed.

“We are absolutely thrilled that it’s coming to an end. Anytime a road project is completed it makes our lives better, not only in the time it takes to get us from location to location, but when traffic routes return to normal, people have less accidents because they’re more familiar with the routes they travel every day,” McAdams said.