During Market Day Dec. 19, seventh graders Sarah Narragon and Sayhra Forbes won first-place honors for their S & S Care, an app to help long-term patients in the hospital deal with isolation.

During Market Day Dec. 19, seventh graders Sarah Narragon and Sayhra Forbes won first-place honors for their S & S Care, an app to help long-term patients in the hospital deal with isolation.

Photo by Deb Jacques


‘Market Day’ spotlights business owners in the making at St. Paul

By: Maria Allard | Grosse Pointe Times | Published January 7, 2020

 Jake Juip displays Convoy, an invention which brings food to you on a conveyor belt at a restaurant.

Jake Juip displays Convoy, an invention which brings food to you on a conveyor belt at a restaurant.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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GROSSE POINTE FARMS — Anyone looking to start a business could learn plenty from the seventh and eighth grade students who attend St. Paul on the Lake Catholic School.

The students, under the direction of K-eight technology teacher Anneliese White, recently created their own businesses using technology, engineering, math and creative thinking skills. The activity was modeled after the ABC television program “Shark Tank.”

Working in pairs or groups of three, the students transformed themselves into entrepreneurs. There were four parts to starting up their businesses. First, the students were required to create a business proposal. Secondly, they designed a logo and slogan. Then it was time for them to make an advertisement or commercial.

The final segment of the project came Dec. 19 when the budding entrepreneurs showcased their creations during Market Day. Stationed at tables with their products, the students shared information about what they created with parents, staff and students in grades K-six, who were able to vote on their two favorite businesses. The crowd was impressed.

“They came out with amazing things,” White said.

For instance, seventh graders Addie Kimmel and Carmella Crane made edible spoons that included flavors of candy cane, white chocolate and peppermint.

“We narrowed it down to our three favorite flavors. They’re 100% edible,” Kimmel said. “Add it to your hot chocolate for a burst of flavor.”

The cost for three spoons was $5.

“We used a silicone mold. We melted all the ingredients. We crushed up the candy cane,” Crane said. “We like warm drinks. We thought it would be a good idea to change the flavor. We had a lot of trial and error.”

Seventh graders Blake Shock, Demetri Borrego and Vincent Swikoski created the company SSG, which stands for Smooth Scented Gel. For anyone who wants their hair to “Look Good Smell Better,” this is your product.

The trio created SSG to give consumers more choices when looking for a hair gel to use. The ingredients were simple: one half teaspoon of gelatin, warm water and essential oils. Seventh grader Doc Reilly was their hair model. The scents were peppermint for winter, lemon grass for spring, orange for summer and pine for fall.

“Hair gel all smells the same. We thought we could come up with something different, so we came up with a scent for all four seasons,” Borrego said.

“We’ve been using it all week, just testing it out,” Shock said.

“I think it’s going well,” Borrego said. “I think we all worked together well.”

Seventh grader Carmen Wilder devised the business Chocobout Chocolate, in which she created a chocolate for people with allergies. She said that the treat could be used as a cake icing or on ice cream. The ingredients included Hershey’s cocoa powder, water, sugar, vanilla and graham crackers.

“I decided to put candy canes and s’mores in it to make a better taste,” she said.

She enjoyed Market Day.

“It’s good to put things together and use your creativity,” Wilder said. “I think it’s very fun.”

Seventh graders Claire Juip and Marie Schueneman won second place with their Crayon Corrector invention. Their slogan was “Don’t Take A Break. Make Life Colorful.”

“We created a slip that goes over your crayon that keeps it from breaking,” Juip said, adding that the pair used a 3D printer to make the contraption. “It took many tries to get the correct size.”

“This is our prototype. You put the top in at the metallic edge,” Schueneman said. “You can color as hard as you want with this.”

The girls said the 3D printer can make different size prototypes to work on all sizes of crayons. Both Juip and Schueneman enjoyed the project.

“It’s awesome,” Schueneman said. “Mrs. White is great. It was an opportunity. We could be very creative.”

Juip and Schueneman received second-place honors at the event. The first-place winners were Sarah Forbes and Sayrha Narragon for their S & S Care, an app for sick patients.    

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