Skateboarders who are part of the Roseville Expansion Project are working with the Tony Hawk Foundation to expand the skate park in Roseville’s Huron Park.

Skateboarders who are part of the Roseville Expansion Project are working with the Tony Hawk Foundation to expand the skate park in Roseville’s Huron Park.

Photo by Donna Agusti


Local group campaigns for new skate park equipment

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published April 2, 2019

 Members of the Roseville Expansion Project, including 18-year-old Reanna Nalepa, of Warren; 20-year-old Brandon Lee, of Roseville; 18-year-old Brandon Mix, of Warren; and 19-year-old Jonathan Nagy, of Eastpointe, are working to expand the Huron Park Skate Park.

Members of the Roseville Expansion Project, including 18-year-old Reanna Nalepa, of Warren; 20-year-old Brandon Lee, of Roseville; 18-year-old Brandon Mix, of Warren; and 19-year-old Jonathan Nagy, of Eastpointe, are working to expand the Huron Park Skate Park.

Photo by Donna Agusti

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ROSEVILLE — Once upon a time, skateboarders were seen as a nuisance to cities. Now, many are working with municipalities to improve their local communities.

One such group is the Roseville Expansion Project. The group of skateboarders and extreme sports enthusiasts are campaigning to expand the Huron Park Skate Park or create a second skate park in Roseville.

The group’s members believe that an expansion would provide more resources for local skaters and would make good use of unused space.

“We want more space,” said Roseville Expansion Project member Jonathan Nagy. “It’s a great park as it is, but it’s always packed. You want lots of room if you have beginners and experts in the same location.”

“There’s two banks of ramps, a pyramid, a rail and some ledges there right now,” added fellow Roseville Expansion Project member Brandon Mix. “There’s also a lot of empty grass. We want to see that additional space used.”

The project members also said that more skate park facilities would be good for the community.

“It’s great for the kids,” said Nagy. “It’s a great way to get young people out of the house and have them stay active in a positive way. … Kids can go out and do something good for them instead of staying inside all day playing ‘Fortnite.’”

They added that even those who have no interest in skating have a vested interest in wanting more park space.

“The project might seem like it’s only for the skateboarding community, but it can be for everybody,” said Roseville Expansion Project member Gabrielle Jakey. “It is a great way to bring people together and make a good place for people to make friends. It’s even right next to a school (Huron Park Elementary).”

The project members are working with the Tony Hawk Foundation to get a Built to Play grant from the organization, which could help fund the expansion efforts.

“A Built to Play grant can provide up to $250,000 in matching funds,” said Trevor Staples, the Built to Play skate park manager. “These guys are just starting to gather support in the community. After they do that, it becomes a matter of raising money via fundraising or from sources like the city.”

The city of Roseville has spoken to the project members, and Recreation Authority of Roseville and Eastpointe Executive Director Tony Lipinski said they are open to the idea.

“They have briefly reached out to us,” said Lipinski. “We are open to the idea, but ultimately the decision has to go to the (Roseville) City Council. No matter how this progresses, it will ultimately cost the city at least some money, so the City Council will have to approve of these plans.”

The Roseville Expansion Project members said they are hoping to make something positive happen for the community and  help the local skateboarding community while they do it.

“It’s not your average outdoor activity,” said Marcus Stackpoole, another Roseville Expansion Project member. “You can push yourself mentally and physically. Usually, when you think of a kid going outside, you think of football or baseball. In extreme sports, your only opponent is yourself. Your goal is self-improvement.”

People interested in supporting the group can do so by searching for “Roseville Expansion Project” on Facebook and Instagram.

“Often, it’s skateboarders working against the city,” said Staples. “Now we’re looking to work with cities to make something good for the community.”

Call Staff Writer Brendan Losinski at (586) 498-1068.

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