An art installation titled “Change is in the air” sits on the fence bordering the tennis court next to Fraser City Hall and Steffens Park.

An art installation titled “Change is in the air” sits on the fence bordering the tennis court next to Fraser City Hall and Steffens Park.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Knitting group in Fraser posts artwork to celebrate evolving city

By: Nick Mordowanec | Fraser - Clinton Township Chronicle | Published June 19, 2019

 Cheryl Moore, Sara Lesich, Laura Lesich, Fraser First Booster Club President Sherry Stein, Pamela Pitts, Theresa Ryder and Gudrun Goetz are part of the local Naughty Knitters group that created the installation.

Cheryl Moore, Sara Lesich, Laura Lesich, Fraser First Booster Club President Sherry Stein, Pamela Pitts, Theresa Ryder and Gudrun Goetz are part of the local Naughty Knitters group that created the installation.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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FRASER — A small group of women in Fraser have brought out their skills for the entire community to see.

Recently, a group of about five women who identify as the Naughty Knitters created an art installation — otherwise known as a yarn bombing — on the fence that surrounds the tennis court near Fraser City Hall.

Vania Apps, of the Fraser First Booster Club, said the installation was designed to express the embracing of change. It’s even called “Change is in the air.” It contains numerous elements, such as crocheted and knitted turtles, frogs and butterflies.

The butterfly portion is a reference to Macomb County Public Works Commissioner Candice Miller and her office’s renewed interest in planting pollinator plants to attract monarch butterflies and provide a potential flyaway zone for the now-endangered species.

Apps said change is a vital aspect of communities, as well as the butterfly ecosystem — “a good example for a community to feel the same way.”

“These women are pretty amazing and have done some amazing things for the community,” she added.

Pamela Pitts started the knitting group about three years ago. Women would come to her house and just knit and crochet, creating items that are donated to various organizations and community endeavors, such as hats for cancer patients, market bags for grocery stores, churches inside and outside the community, children’s causes and the local Fraser Optimist Club.

They usually convene on Wednesday evenings. It’s an opportunity for the women to “get together and spend time,” she said.

Other women who lack the skills to knit or crochet, or just don’t have the time, will purchase supplies that the ladies use to create their own socks, gloves, hats and more. It has vastly reduced the group’s out-of-pocket costs.

“Our group has literally donated thousands of dollars to the group (Fraser First Booster Club) for McKinley Park,” Pitts said. “We have no clear-cut path. We just kind of do our own thing.”

Laura Lesich and her daughter, Sara, a student at Grand Valley State University, helped create this specific art installation. Laura said she worked behind the scenes, getting the city permit, finding items and aiding in the installation.

“We’ve got a nice, solid group of volunteers who are passionate,” Lesich said.

In addition to the frogs, turtles and butterflies, anyone in the community can swing by and take photos with the colorful piece of artwork, which is continually being added onto.

Lesich said it’s nice to see adults and children take photos with the installation, and then see them posted on social media. When there are activities going on at nearby Steffens Park, people notice.

“Our whole city is about change, and we want to make sure people embrace it,” Lesich said. “Let’s go with the changes.”

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