The marker for Martha Baldwin’s grave stands in Greenwood Cemetery, pictured here last spring. Stories from the historical Greenwood Cemetery will be part of an upcoming history lecture on local neighborhoods.

The marker for Martha Baldwin’s grave stands in Greenwood Cemetery, pictured here last spring. Stories from the historical Greenwood Cemetery will be part of an upcoming history lecture on local neighborhoods.

File photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Joint lecture to focus on Birmingham’s neighborhoods

By: Tiffany Esshaki | Birmingham - Bloomfield Eagle | Published April 9, 2019

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BIRMINGHAM — Which part of Birmingham used to be known as Little San Francisco? How about the neighborhood dubbed Eco-City?

Those unique residential areas will be the topic of the second installment in the Birmingham Museum’s three-part joint lecture series with the Baldwin Public Library.

“Birmingham Neighborhoods and Their Stories” will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 11, at the library.

Local historians and members of the Friends of the Birmingham Museum board Pam DeWeese and George Getschman will present the program, highlighting their research findings accumulated over the years.

“People in Birmingham love their neighborhoods and are fascinated by the history behind such things as the street names, the politics of old deed restrictions or why the houses look the way they do in different areas,” DeWeese said in a prepared statement. “Our different neighborhoods are a part of what makes Birmingham what it was and also what it is today.”

One surprising element of the presentation will be stories from the historical Greenwood Cemetery. DeWeese and Getschman have learned a lot about the property, which is the resting place of residents and even a few local celebrities, like Martha Baldwin, artist Marshall M. Fredericks and author Elmore Leonard.

“It’s a completely different kind of ‘neighborhood,’ you might say,” said Getschman in an email. “And just like the other areas of Birmingham, we learn something new about it all the time that makes us appreciate it even more.”

The final presentation in the series will take place Thursday, May 9, when Birmingham Museum Director Leslie Pielack will team up with Birmingham Shopping District Executive Director Ingrid Tighe for a discussion on Birmingham’s distinctive commercial history.

There is no cost or registration required to attend the lectures.

For more information, call the museum at (248) 530-1928 or visit bhamgov.gov/museum.

The Baldwin Public Library is located at 300 W. Merrill St. in downtown Birmingham.

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