Residents in the area of Lakeshore Drive and Riverdale Street fill sandbags in an effort to save their homes from the rising water levels on May 3.

Residents in the area of Lakeshore Drive and Riverdale Street fill sandbags in an effort to save their homes from the rising water levels on May 3.

Photo by Julie Snyder


Harrison Township declares state of emergency

Lake levels continue to rise, sandbags available

By: Julie Snyder | Mount Clemens - Clinton - Harrison Journal | Published May 4, 2019

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HARRISON TOWNSHIP — With the lake levels continuing to rise, Harrison Township officials have declared a state of emergency.

On May 3, Supervisor Ken Verkest said while a vast majority of residents and property remain clear from hazard as a result of the rising waters, the declaration is necessary because there are still residents and homes facing potential damage.

Since the beginning of the week, township officials have been using equipment to pump water from affected roads and properties. In addition, the township continues to distributie sandbags to residents in need. There are four sand piles around the township that could be used for filling bags: Lakeshore Drive and Riverdale Street; Old North River Road; South River Road and Father Street; and Jefferson Avenue across from Sunnydale Street.

A weekly lake levels report released May 3 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ NOAA Center for Operational Oceanic Products and Services International Joint Commission, Detroit District, states that Lake St. Clair is 11 inches above its level a month ago. It’s also up 3 inches from the previous weekly report on April 26.

“And the levels are expected to go up another 8 inches until the peak season in July,” Verkest said.

Keith Kompoltowicz, chief of watershed hydrology with the Army Corps of Engineers, said earlier in the week that a six-month forecast report is slated to be released on May 6.

“The six-month forecast will give a better indication of what water levels will be this summer,” Kompoltowicz said. “We’re looking at higher levels this summer because of how wet it’s been. Water levels rose significantly over the past couple of weeks.”

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