Troy residents Crystal Harabedian, right, and her husband, George Harabedian, look over the produce at the Troy Farmers Market Oct. 19. The market will be open for the last time this year Oct. 26.

Troy residents Crystal Harabedian, right, and her husband, George Harabedian, look over the produce at the Troy Farmers Market Oct. 19. The market will be open for the last time this year Oct. 26.

Photo by Sean Work


First year of Troy Farmers Market winds down

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published October 24, 2018

 Seasoned salts from vendor Lot’s Wyfe sit on display at the market, held in the parking lot of the Troy Public Library.

Seasoned salts from vendor Lot’s Wyfe sit on display at the market, held in the parking lot of the Troy Public Library.

Photo by Sean Work

 Pasta e’ Pasta proprietor Francesca Giglio, left, of Chesterfield Township, urges Troy residents Valeria and Joe Maczuga, right, to try her cannolis at the Troy Farmers Market Oct. 19.

Pasta e’ Pasta proprietor Francesca Giglio, left, of Chesterfield Township, urges Troy residents Valeria and Joe Maczuga, right, to try her cannolis at the Troy Farmers Market Oct. 19.

Photo by Sean Work

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TROY — The Troy Farmers Market offered shoppers fresh fruit, flowers, herbs, vegetables, and an array of other products during its first year in operation.

Shoppers could enjoy food from different food trucks throughout the season, as well as browse cupcakes, ice cream, homemade dog and cat treats, jellies, nuts, cider, doughnuts, pasta products, starter plants, gourmet salts and wooden kitchen utensils.

Cindy Stewart, the city’s community affairs director and the market manager, said the biggest challenge in getting started was “getting Troy residents and businesses to know we have a farmers market.”

She said that as many as 1,100 people and on average 500 to 700 people shopped the market 3-7 p.m. on Fridays in the parking lot of the Troy Public Library, 510 W. Big Beaver Road.

The final market day this year will be Oct. 26.

“Even in the rain, people still came out,” Stewart said. “The majority of the vendors said they were thrilled with the inaugural market and pleased with how nice the customers were, and that they were shoppers.”

Stewart said they may tweak the hours for next year, and they plan to conduct a survey to see if the hours of 2-6 p.m. or 11 a.m.-3 p.m. would work better.

“It went well,” said Gerry Garrett, a representative of Blake Farms in Armada, which has been in business since 1946. He sold cider, doughnuts, tomatoes and corn at the market. “They did a really great job,” he said of Troy.

He said that even larger crowds of shoppers would likely prompt more farms to participate.

“It worked out really good,” said Greg Phinney, from Phinney’s Farms, located in Macomb Township. He sold starter vegetable plants, herbs, cut flowers and tomatoes. He noted that it was a bad year for tomatoes due to the hot, dry summer.

Phinney said he does not use chemicals or pesticides.

“I enjoyed being there,” he said of the Troy market.

The Troy Farmers Market will be open for the last time this year Oct. 26. Visit troymi.gov for a list of vendors.

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