Ferndale teen’s design to be last inclusivity mural installation

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published August 27, 2019

 Daphne Wilson’s design, seen here, will be the fourth piece of art created for the Ferndale Arts and Cultural Commission’s inclusivity mural collection.

Daphne Wilson’s design, seen here, will be the fourth piece of art created for the Ferndale Arts and Cultural Commission’s inclusivity mural collection.

Image provided by Mark Loeb

 Sixteen-year-old Daphne Wilson’s mural design will be placed alongside three others on the side of the Cupcake  Station at Allen and Nine Mile roads.

Sixteen-year-old Daphne Wilson’s mural design will be placed alongside three others on the side of the Cupcake Station at Allen and Nine Mile roads.

Photo by Donna Agusti

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FERNDALE — The latest mural to be placed on the side of a downtown Ferndale business has been chosen.

The Ferndale Arts and Cultural Commission has selected a work from Daphne Wilson, a Ferndale High School senior, to be featured as the last mural on the wall of the Cupcake Station at the corner of Allen and Nine Mile roads.

The work has been selected as part of the Arts and Cultural Commission’s yearly inclusivity mural contest, where local high schoolers are asked to create a piece of art based on the theme of inclusivity.

“The arts commission looks through all different murals and looks for one that we feel really represents the concept of inclusivity, and also is something that will not be too similar to one of the ones we’ve done in the past and has some artistic merit,” said Mark Loeb, a member of the Arts and Cultural Commission.

Wilson’s mural will be publically created during the three-day Funky Ferndale Art Fair and DIY Street Fair events, which will take place Sept. 20-22. With the help of professional artist Kia Ix Arriaga, the public themselves can take part in creating the mural.

Wilson, of Ferndale, heard about the contest in one of her classes at the Center for Advanced Studies and the Arts, While she originally wasn’t planning on entering art for the contest, her teacher, Stella Johnstone, saw a design that she had been working on and encouraged her to submit it.

When she thought about the word “inclusivity,” another one came to mind that helped Wilson create her design — “accepting.”

“They’re both very similar words, and you can’t be inclusive without accepting everything,” she said. “In a community, you have to be accepting of all different types of people, no matter where they come from or where they’re going. Including anyone’s story in a piece of art or whatever it may be … you just want to be able to include anyone that might be present or might be seeing it or influenced by it.”

The 16-year-old’s work features a mix of different people — some inspired by her friends and some she randomly created — but all carry various colors instead of a single skin tone.

“Just the way all these different faces, they’re all looking at the audience, not really interacting but they’re so many different personalities, you can’t really tell specifically ethnic groups because none of them are done in those types of colors,” Loeb said of what the commission liked about Wilson’s piece.

Wilson said she aimed to have every face in the work have every single color that was featured.

“Each one has the same color that ties to one of the other faces,” she said. “It’s kind of like everything is connected throughout this one similar trait. … We all share something.”

Learning that her work had been chosen as the final mural was exciting, said Wilson, as it wasn’t something she expected.

“It’s pretty cool because you walk around Ferndale and there’s murals here and there, and a lot of them are art from the AP class at CASA. … It’s really cool to be a part of that small group of people who actually get chosen for this thing,” she said. “I go downtown all the time, so I’ll just walk by and see my piece of art on the wall. I’m really excited.”

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