The city of Eastpointe is encouraging residents to comply with state law and get their dogs properly vaccinated and registered.

The city of Eastpointe is encouraging residents to comply with state law and get their dogs properly vaccinated and registered.

Photo provided by Brian Pylar


Eastpointe steps up efforts to register local dogs

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published June 4, 2019

 Eastpointe hosted a free licensing and microchipping event at its City Hall May 5 to encourage residents to properly license their dogs in accordance with state law.

Eastpointe hosted a free licensing and microchipping event at its City Hall May 5 to encourage residents to properly license their dogs in accordance with state law.

Photo provided by Brian Pylar

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EASTPOINTE — The city of Eastpointe is getting the word out to residents to register their dogs with the city and vaccinate them.

Since hiring a new animal control officer, Brian Pylar, last November, Eastpointe has been stepping up its efforts to improve animal control services within the community.

“The citizens of Eastpointe love their animals,” Eastpointe Director of Public Safety George Rouhib said in an email. “It is vital that the city have a progressive program to insure the safety and welfare of all pets. The majority of the animals that are reported stray are not licensed or chipped. It is vital that these tasks are completed so we can immediately return the pet to its rightful owner.”

The push to inform residents to license their dogs is not only a safety issue, but a legal one as well.

“It’s required by the state that the dog be registered with the city as well as be vaccinated,” Pylar explained. “This has been in the law in Michigan for years. … There is a ticketable offense if people break that law, and we are trying to get the word out there and educate people. We really want to push outreach and education.”

Pylar said registering a dog ensures the animal has received its proper shots and vaccinations.

“Conditions like rabies, leptospirosis and worms are out there, and dogs come in with those diseases all the time,” he explained. “Humans can catch some of them, such as rabies, which are zoonotic diseases. Getting them registered and vaccinated is what’s good for the animal and also what is good for the community as a whole. … Usually vaccinations are done once their dog is 4 months of age or older, which is when a dog can get their rabies vaccine”

Pylar also stressed how registration increases the odds of reuniting a missing dog with its owner.

“If your dog goes missing, it dramatically improves the chances of getting the dog back. When a dog is found, we can just look up the license and find the owner,” he said. “Plus, people can feel safer if they know it’s vaccinated and will probably be more willing to approach it and turn it in.”

The registration process is quick and easy, according to Pylar.

“All they have to do is bring their proof of vaccination to City Hall and they can get their dog registered at the Clerk’s desk,” he said. “The fee varies. It’s cheaper, at $7, if the dog is spayed or neutered. If it’s not, it’s $13 for a one-year license. If they get a three-year vaccination, they can get the three-year license. The cost for a spayed or neutered dog for three years is $10 and is $25 for a non-neutered dog.”

Those who do not register their dog with their local municipality are subject to fines or citations.

“Late fees are charged if their licenses aren’t renewed by March 1,” said Pylar. “March 1 is how long each yearly license lasts. This doesn’t count new dogs, which people can register when they get the dog, assuming it’s old enough.”

He also said he wanted to remind people that having to register a dog is better than having to pay a citation.

“The cost of a license is way less than the penalty of being caught without one,” said Pylar. “A first offense is $65, second is $125 and the third is $250.”

The city is taking steps to educate the public on the subject. It hosted a free event to help residents register and microchip their pets, and it hopes to host another one soon.

“We did a free microchip event recently in Eastpointe on May 5,” Pylar said. “We microchipped 103 dogs and five cats. We waived the licensing fee on that day as well to encourage people to come out and take part. … Microchipping a pet so they can be found if they become lost is always also advisable.”

Rouhib said that improving the registration and vaccination rates in the city is only the first step in improving the quality of life for pets and owners.

“We want to make certain that all dogs are up to date with their vaccinations, especially rabies,” Rouhib wrote. “We will continue to enhance our programs by constantly educating our citizens and receiving their feedback. Eventually we would like to obtain the proper licensing and have our own kennel at the Police Department and formulate a separate Facebook page for our residents to discuss animal issues.”

Call Staff Writer Brendan Losinski at (586) 498-1068.

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