Both Eastpointe and Roseville are receiving money from the federal government through the CARES program to help deal with the financial difficulties brought about by COVID-19. Roseville used some of its grant money to purchase a new ambulance.

Both Eastpointe and Roseville are receiving money from the federal government through the CARES program to help deal with the financial difficulties brought about by COVID-19. Roseville used some of its grant money to purchase a new ambulance.

Photo provided by Brian Kanigowksi


Eastpointe and Roseville receive money to fight COVID-19

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published November 10, 2020

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EASTPOINTE/ROSEVILLE — Both the cities of Eastpointe and Roseville are receiving money from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, which is money from the federal government distributed through the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The money will reimburse communities that have spent money on efforts to stop the spread of the pandemic.

“The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced on Sept. 11 the third and final round of allocation of the $5 billion Congress provided in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act in supplemental Community Development Block Grant funding,” Roseville City Manager Scott Adkins explained in an email. “This third round of CDBG-CV funding totals $1.988 billion and specifically prioritizes communities with high rates of individuals in industries with high job loss in states with high unemployment, communities with high rates of businesses in industries with high job loss in states with high unemployment, and concentrations of those most at risk for transmission and risk of eviction, with higher amounts for states with high rates of coronavirus.”

“Funds made available to Eastpointe are to reimburse us for money spent on supplies, operating expenses, (information technology) and extra wages related to COVID per state or county dictates,” Eastpointe Finance Director Randy Blum said in an email. “We are not doing anything with small business grants. The county is handling that part of the funding.”

The distribution is likely to be a one-time program to help communities that have had to put up money from their own budgets to combat the effects of COVID-19.

“CARES is the name of the multi-trillion dollar relief package passed by Congress due to the COVID induced national shutdown,” Blum explained. “This better be a one time event. Eastpointe did not receive any direct funds. The city is being provided some funding through the State of Michigan and Macomb County.”

The money can be spent in several ways, but it has to help the community with the effects of the pandemic.

“We’re limited in how we can use the funds and we have to follow the procedures set forth by the government so they have to be used for low to moderate income businesses and have it focused on coronavirus relief,” said Adkins.

The funds have been distributed in a series of rounds.

“There were two rounds going to qualified municipalities,” said Adkins. “We have already utilized grants from the first round to purchase a new ambulance and now we’re looking at how to best use the funds from the second round. This may mean communitywide testing (for COVID), but it will help with our pandemic response and planning. We hope to use some for low to moderate income housing assistance, but it is too early to say.”

“Funds made available to Eastpointe will only reimburse us for money already spent,” said Blum. “Nothing allocated to the city is directly tied to the residents. These types of monies are through state or county programs.”

The exact amount of money being given to each community has not yet been determined in Eastpointe, but Adkins said Roseville has received $614,934 so far.

“(We) do not know the amount yet. We will receive amounts from the state and the county based on the various allocation methods created for each piece of the grant funds,” wrote Blum. “If we receive everything requested, it will be over $1 million.”

Both said that the money can be used to help fill in the holes that responding to COVID-19 has left in their cities’ respective budgets.

“This money will provide safer public safety response, community services and protective measures in the fight against COVID-19,” said Adkins. “Hopefully, we can use it to make noticeable improvements to the lives of our residents.”

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