“Winter Landscape in Moonlight,” by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, is one of several art pieces that can be seen in Berkley as part of the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Inside|Out program. This installation is located at the Berkley Public Library.

“Winter Landscape in Moonlight,” by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, is one of several art pieces that can be seen in Berkley as part of the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Inside|Out program. This installation is located at the Berkley Public Library.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Detroit Institute of Arts’ Inside|Out program arrives in Berkley

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published July 21, 2020

 Another art installation, “Girl and Laurel,” by Winslow Homer, can be found at Jaycee Park.

Another art installation, “Girl and Laurel,” by Winslow Homer, can be found at Jaycee Park.

Photo by Deb Jacques

BERKLEY — Several months ago, the Detroit Institute of Arts announced that Berkley was to be one of the sites participating in this year’s Inside|Out program.

The program sees reproductions of art pieces featured at the DIA installed in communities in Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties. The installation of those pieces recently was completed in Berkley.

Six reproductions were installed at various locations around the city. The pieces are “Girl and Laurel,” by Winslow Homer, which can be found at Jaycee Park; “Tiled Niche,” by Ustad Mahammad Husayn, which is located at Odd Fellows Antiques; “Reading the Story of Oenone,” by Francis Davis Millet, located at Berkley Common; “Winter Landscape in Moonlight,” by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, found at the Berkley Public Library; “Violinist and Young Woman,” by Edgar Degas, found at the Berkley Community Center; and “Rounded Flower Bed,” by Claude Monet, located at Oxford Towers Park.

In deciding where to put the art pieces, the library and Community Center were chosen, Berkley’s Public Policy Assistant Dan Hill said in an email, as they are two of the most frequently visited buildings in the summer,

Jaycee Park, he said, was selected due to the programming that normally occurs at the park during the summer and also in the fall for events such as Tales on the Trail. Oxford Towers Park was selected to geographically spread the locations around the city and because of its proximity to the Oxford Park Towers senior living facility.

“In anticipation of the (Road Commission for Oakland County) project occurring on Twelve Mile Road, we aimed to use 2 of our 6 pieces as attractions to help draw the public to the downtown area on Twelve Mile during the construction process which we thought may slow pedestrian traffic or may dissuade patrons from accessing the area businesses,” Hill stated.

Community Engagement Officer Torri Mathes added that the biggest things the city tried to focus on with this project was trying to get people out and about, and highlighting as much of Berkley as they could.

“We just wanted to encourage residents to get out, especially now with the weather being nice … and an activity that’s appropriate given the circumstances we’re in as a nation. This was just another opportunity to get people outside, as well as learn about art,” she said.

DIA Regional Public Relations Manager Megan Hawthorne said that when the institute selects the art, it tries to go with a variety of pieces that can be seen at the museum.

The Inside|Out program, now in its 11th year, partnered with 25 cities this year in all three counties.

“Given everything that’s going on, it’s an outdoor way for people to experience some of the things they can see at the DIA,” she said. “There are going to be individuals who don’t feel comfortable coming back to the DIA yet, and that is OK. Every year it’s exciting. We really value our partnerships with the community, so it’s really exciting for us to bring a little bit of the DIA right to people’s backyards.”