Council will consider the new Troy master plan

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published July 27, 2016

 Currently, those who want to get to these restaurants, stores and the sports center from Automation Alley on the south side of Big Beaver must cross this busy crosswalk at John R Road.

Currently, those who want to get to these restaurants, stores and the sports center from Automation Alley on the south side of Big Beaver must cross this busy crosswalk at John R Road.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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TROY — The city master plan will focus on the needs of an aging population that wants to stay in Troy, more density in strategic locations, more housing and transportation options, walkable locations and protection of existing neighborhoods. 

“It seems like a long time ago that we started this project,” said Troy Planning Director R. Brent Savidant at the June 28 Planning Commission meeting. 

“I think it’s important to note we’ve been working on the updated plan for three years,” said Planning Commission Chair Donald Edmunds. 

The Planning Commission unanimously recommended that the City Council approve the master plan, which the council will consider at its Aug. 22 regular meeting. 

Nobody spoke during the public hearing portion of the June 28 Planning Commission meeting when the master plan was presented. 

Savidant said that upon review of the 2008 master plan, much of it was still relevant and required only a few tweaks. These included updating the demographics and housing priorities, and plans for Maple Road, north Troy, Rochester Road and making Big Beaver Road more pedestrian-friendly. This would include developing a mid-walk crosswalk from Automation Alley, west of John R on eastbound Big Beaver Road, to the Starbucks on westbound Big Beaver Road, and improving the walkway under Interstate 75 along Big Beaver. 

“Troy is aging, Troy is diversifying and Troy is experiencing changing preferences,” Savidant said. 

For example, Savidant said that “by 2040, for the first time in our history, Troy will have more seniors than people under the age of 18,” he said.

Also, the number of households without children and with one child continues to increase. 

“This has implications on housing size and housing opportunities,” he said. 

“We still have 72 percent of our households as single, detached,” he said. “Troy’s housing stock is not representative of the anticipated future population,” Savidant said. 

Savidant said the city wanted to provide an opportunity for those who want to “age in place. We want to provide an opportunity for those who worked and raised their children in Troy to continue to live in Troy once the children move out,” he said. 

He said this would involve creating a place that features smaller-scale homes, a place for social engagement and well-being, such as health and medical services, mobility and financial services. He added that townhomes and bungalows, characterized by walkability, “are missing in Troy.” 

Hard copies and electronic copies of the proposed Troy master plan are available through the city Planning Department by calling (248) 524-3364.

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