The Eastpointe Department of Public Safety released its crime statistics for 2018. The results showed a decrease in all categories between 2017 and 2018 except for murder, which increased from one case to two, and auto thefts, which increased by 50%.

The Eastpointe Department of Public Safety released its crime statistics for 2018. The results showed a decrease in all categories between 2017 and 2018 except for murder, which increased from one case to two, and auto thefts, which increased by 50%.

Photo by Deb Jacques


2018 Eastpointe crime statistics show overall drop, increase in auto thefts

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published April 5, 2019

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EASTPOINTE — The Eastpointe Department of Public Safety released its crime statistics for 2018, revealing which types of crime went up and went down in the past year within the city.

The department generated the statistics using the Courts and Law Enforcement Management Information System. The department released statistics for crimes it is required to report to the FBI each year for its annual Uniform Crime Report.

Cases of robbery decreased from 59 reported cases in 2017 to 45 cases in 2018, which was a 23.73% decrease. Cases of sexual assault went down from 58 to 46 in the same time frame, which was a reduction of 20.69%. Aggravated assault reports went down from 928 to 739, showing a reduction of 20.37%. Burglary decreased from 238 to 173 cases, which was a 27.31% drop. Larceny-theft went down 10%, with a drop from 580 cases to 522 cases. Arson also dropped from 10 cases to seven, a 30% reduction, in 2018.

Two categories showed increases. There were two cases of murder in 2018 after one case in 2017. Additionally, motor vehicle thefts increased from 186 to 279 between 2017 and 2018, which was a 50% increase.

City officials said the numbers are showing a positive overall trend in crime prevention, and they demonstrate that recent efforts to reach out to the public and cut down on specific crimes have been effective.

“Overall, I am pleased with the reduction in violent crimes. However, I am concerned about the number of reported incidents,” said Eastpointe Director of Public Safety George Rouhib.

“I think we got more awareness,” added Eastpointe Mayor Suzanne Pixley. “We’ve been able to get our patrol officers out on the street more. I think people are contacting the Police Department more, and they have been able to cut their response time down. … George started in October. He’s been improving our community outreach, and I think that is making a difference and people are seeing the difference our police are making.”

Rouhib is seeking to assign officers to specific task forces in 2019 as a concerted effort to further curtail crime in Eastpointe.

“I am confident once we increase our staffing levels and develop specialized units, we will see a greater reduction in crime,” he said. “For instance, many violent crimes are a result of narcotic addiction. People commit violent acts because they are high on drugs and steal to support their habit. Once we implement a narcotics unit, we will gather intelligence on known drug houses and begin to close them down one by one.”

The outlier of the results, and the only area to show significant increases in 2018, was auto thefts. Rouhib is hoping participation with the Macomb County Auto Theft Squad and local neighborhood watch efforts will reduce that number in 2019.

“In respect to auto theft, our plan is to assign an officer into the Macomb Auto Theft Squad to curtail auto thefts in the city. This is a grant-funded position,” Rouhib said. “In addition, when we create our neighborhood watch groups, we will teach our citizens how to identify certain crimes, how to network with one another and work with our officers as a collective group. This will serve as a deterrence.”

City officials shared their advice for residents to prevent crime in their community.

“We recommend being aware of your surroundings and trusting your instincts or gut feelings,” said Deputy Chief Eric Keiser. “Don’t talk yourself out of being alarmed. If you see something out of place, call us. We would rather investigate and have it be nothing, than have it be a serious crime we only find out about after someone’s been victimized.”

“We also want to warn people to be aware of scammers targeting seniors,” said Pixley. “They come to the door, and people shouldn’t open the door, even if these people are trying to sell you something or save you money by offering you a lower gas bill or lower water bill. Real vendors would have an Eastpointe identification, because anyone selling something in the city would have to be registered with the city clerk and would have a permit.”

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