On May 31, Resurrection Cemetery hosted its annual Memorial Day service in Clinton Township. The ceremony included the dedication of veterans inscription tablets.

On May 31, Resurrection Cemetery hosted its annual Memorial Day service in Clinton Township. The ceremony included the dedication of veterans inscription tablets.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Memorial Day service pays tribute to America’s fallen

By: Alex Szwarc | C&G Newspapers | Published June 3, 2021

 Command Sgt. Maj. William W. Russell III was the guest speaker at this year’s Memorial Day remembrance. He said that for hundreds of years, the military has carried the American flag into battle in the name of freedom.

Command Sgt. Maj. William W. Russell III was the guest speaker at this year’s Memorial Day remembrance. He said that for hundreds of years, the military has carried the American flag into battle in the name of freedom.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

CLINTON TOWNSHIP — Over 100 people paid their respects to fallen members of the armed forces by way of a Memorial Day service recently.

On May 31, Resurrection Cemetery in Clinton Township hosted its annual service.

At the ceremony, held at the veterans memorial, Resurrection Cemetery Director Tim Burrows thanked those in attendance as the community gathered to remember American heroes, their achievements, their courage and dedication.

The ceremony was open to the public, first with a Catholic mass, followed by a service to dedicate veterans inscription tablets.

It included members of the Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 154 laying flowers by the memorial, 21 veteran names being added for dedication, and a message from the guest speaker, Command Sgt. Maj. William W. Russell III.  

Russell, who was born in Madison Heights, said that on Memorial Day, Americans pay tribute to those members who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to America, by honoring their memory and lifting up the grieving Gold Star family members.

“For hundreds of years, our military has carried the American flag into battle in the name of freedom,” Russell said. “They hosted the flag high above great battleships. They fought fiercely to plant it atop isolated islands in the Pacific and throughout Europe during World War II.”

In the Korean War, he said the flag was carried through the ice and snow, the sweltering heat of Vietnam in the Vietnam War, the blistering sands of Iraq in the Iraq War, and to the highest Afghanistan mountaintops in the War in Afghanistan, so Americans could be free.

“When we look at those broad stripes and bright stars, we are reminded of the freedoms and ideals they represent,” Russell said. “And the sacrifices of those who have fought and died for those freedoms.”

He concluded his remarks by encouraging folks to spend quality time with family and friends, and to find meaningful ways to reflect and honor American heroes and their families.  

Clinton Township Supervisor Bob Cannon served as the master of ceremonies.

“The beauty and reverence of these hallowed grounds are spectacular,” he said. “There’s no other place I’d rather be than here on Memorial Day to reflect on the ultimate sacrifice that so many men and women have made serving our country with dignity.”

He noted that, while it’s nice to recognize veterans, Memorial Day is for Americans to remember their ancestors, family, friends, and folks from their hometown they never met, who died in the line of duty.

“We celebrate because we know we live in the greatest country on earth,” Cannon said. “We mourn because we know so many men and women gave their lives so we could enjoy our freedom.”   

Chaplain Bruce Storace, of VVA Chapter 154, said that, as many enjoy the beginning of the summer season, the community pays honor and tribute to those and their families who remind them what Memorial Day is about: freedom.

“Some were rangers, some aviators, some Seabees, some grunts, some navigators, some berets, some SEALs, some Marines, some mechanics and some chaplains — all dedicated to the sacrifice of life that’s required,” he said.   

The cemetery’s next event is a Children’s Remembrance, set for Aug. 28.