Southfield resident Randy Scott poses for a photo with his instruments. Scott’s latest single, “Joyride” reached No. 1 on the Smooth Jazz Songs Billboard chart for the week of Oct. 10.

Southfield resident Randy Scott poses for a photo with his instruments. Scott’s latest single, “Joyride” reached No. 1 on the Smooth Jazz Songs Billboard chart for the week of Oct. 10.

Photo provided by Randy Scott


Southfield resident sees song reach No. 1 on Billboard charts

By: Jacob Herbert | Southfield Sun | Published October 21, 2020

 Scott recorded the song at the B Hive Studio in Arizona with Michael Broening. This is the first time Scott has had a single reach No.1 on the charts.

Scott recorded the song at the B Hive Studio in Arizona with Michael Broening. This is the first time Scott has had a single reach No.1 on the charts.

Photo provided by Randy Scott

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SOUTHFIELD — Randy Scott always dreamed that this would happen. The Southfield resident would drive around town listening to the jazz station on Sirius XM radio and imagine that his song was playing. When he looked at the jazz charts on Billboard.com, he would always imagine his song at the top.

That dream finally became a reality the week of Oct. 10, when Scott’s single “Joyride” reached No. 1 on the smooth jazz songs Billboard chart.

“The record label called me because they give me an update each week,” Scott said. “I knew I was approaching it. I was at three or five the week prior. When he called and said I was No. 1, without exaggeration I ran around the house and did a couple cartwheels. It was excitement on a whole other level.”

“Joyride” is the single off Scott’s latest album “Elevation,” released Aug. 21. The album was released through London-based label Trippin ‘N’ Rhythm and distributed by Sony.

As thrilled as Scott is with this accomplishment, one that he ranks at the top in his career thus far, it almost didn’t happen. Scott recorded the majority of the album at his home in Southfield in 2019. After wrapping the album up in July and sending it to the label, the two parties agreed the album was not good enough.

Scott invested thousands of dollars of his own money into the project, but the group decided it needed to be more radio friendly. So it was back to the drawing board.

Scott admitted he thought about scrapping the entire project instead of starting over. But from July 2019 to May 2020, he redid the entire record with some financial help from his label and produced a No. 1 single.

“That makes it so much sweeter, because that was rough to spend two years working on something. I think I spent almost 12 grand of my own money trying to finish it,” Scott said. “Then having to redo all of that was a tough pill to swallow. However, I came out with a better product having done that.”

“Joyride” was recorded with Michael Broening at B Hive Studio in Peoria, Arizona. Broening wrote and produced the song before sending it off to Scott, who made it his own.

“I’ve worked with many artists throughout the years, and I’ve yet to meet one more deserving of this success than Randy,” Broening said in an email. “He’s that guy that you root for and want good things to happen because he has a genuine humility that is rare among musicians. He’s just a fantastic person and a great player. It’s awesome to see the country finally see his talent.”

Scott said he owes a lot of his success to his mother, who was a huge fan of fellow jazz artist Grover Washington Jr., and that rubbed off on Scott. When everyone else was listening to Michael Jackson and Prince, Scott was listening to Washington Jr.

When he was 12 years old, Scott earned straight A’s on his report card and got to meet Washington Jr., who was in town filming a Red Cross commercial, as a result. From that day forward the two saxophonists became close friends, and Washington Jr. would often invite Scott to perform with him onstage.

“He is the whole reason I even play the instrument,” Scott said of Washington Jr.

When Scott graduated high school in Philadelphia, he received a full scholarship to the Berklee School of Music in Boston, Massachusetts. Through the direction of Washington Jr., Scott applied to and accepted a full ride to Michigan State University, a school that Washington Jr. believed would better tailor Scott’s skills.

Now, after years of perfecting his craft and investing large portions of his own money, Scott has a No. 1 single that he can listen to on the radio on any given day. He always imagined hearing a DJ call his name. Now that he has realized his dreams, it’s almost overwhelming the amount of times he’s heard the song.

“It’s actually getting to that obnoxious stage, which is a blessing,” Scott said with a laugh. “I’m so grateful for that. It’s one of those songs where you hear it and you’re like, ‘wow this song again.’”

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