An apple blossom, Michigan’s state flower, basks in the sunshine at Carpenter Lake Nature Preserve. The Southfield City Council recently authorized the formation of a Wildlife Advisory Committee.

An apple blossom, Michigan’s state flower, basks in the sunshine at Carpenter Lake Nature Preserve. The Southfield City Council recently authorized the formation of a Wildlife Advisory Committee.

File photo by Deb Jacques


Southfield City Council approves formation of Wildlife Advisory Commission

By: Kayla Dimick | Southfield Sun | Published July 7, 2020

 A Canada goose enjoys the lake.

A Canada goose enjoys the lake.

File photo by Deb Jacques

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SOUTHFIELD — With the number of deer and other wildlife that call the city home on the rise, the city has decided to form the Wildlife Advisory Commission.

At its June 22 meeting, the Southfield City Council unanimously approved the formation of the commission.

According to Deputy City Administrator John Michrina, the commission will be made up of seven residents, who will be appointed by the council.

“Many animals have adapted to the suburban settings. Interactions between residents and wildlife such as deer and coyotes are increasing. Some residents are very concerned about this, and some residents enjoy it,” Michrina said in an email.

The goal of the group is to develop and propose a wildlife program within the city, Michrina said, with a focus on the safety, health and welfare of Southfield residents and visitors.

“Overall, we want to figure out how we can appropriately and in the best circumstances deal with some of these wildlife, where it can be a win-win for the wildlife as well as for the city residents and businesses to make sure we can live harmoniously together where everyone is satisfied,” Councilman Michael Mandelbaum said.

“The commission will be a place for residents of all viewpoints to work together to craft a plan to ensure the safety, health and welfare of the residents and visitors to the city of Southfield and of the wildlife within the city of Southfield,” Michrina said.

Many other nearby cities have similar commissions, Michrina said, namely, Rochester Hills, which has a Deer Management Advisory Council, but city officials thought it best to expand the commission to include all types of wildlife.

Members of the commission will work with Southfield residents and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, along with other county, state and federal groups responsible for wildlife management, Michrina said.

Mandelbaum, who chairs the council’s subcommittee for boards and commissions, said the subcommittee will go through the applications for the commission.

“We have people that are generally interested in making sure that wildlife can be studied officially and appropriately and figure out what we need to do,” Mandelbaum said.

One of the things that the wildlife commission will get to work on is issues of the deer population in the city.

“Many people love the deer, but many people feel that the deer interfere with daily life, whether it’s car accidents or eating flowers, vegetables,” Mandelbaum said. “We now have a coyote problem that has gotten more and more residents nervous.”

Residents who wish to apply to be on the commission can go to cityofsouthfield.com/boards-commissions or the City Clerk’s Office inside City Hall, 26000 Evergreen Road.

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