West Marshall Street is one of at least 25 streets that will receive road improvements in the city of Ferndale. Some of the improvements the street is scheduled to get include new pavement, bioretention areas for stormwater management, conventional bike lanes and striped on-street parking.

West Marshall Street is one of at least 25 streets that will receive road improvements in the city of Ferndale. Some of the improvements the street is scheduled to get include new pavement, bioretention areas for stormwater management, conventional bike lanes and striped on-street parking.

Photo by Mike Koury


Cities laying out plans for road construction in 2020

By: Mike Koury | C&G Newspapers | Published January 21, 2020

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OAKLAND COUNTY — Living in Michigan means residents live through not four, but five seasons: winter, spring, summer, fall and road construction.

Road construction season is as much a part of living in the mitten state as anything else. For the residents of Ferndale, Berkley, Huntington Woods and Pleasant Ridge, city officials have revealed an early look at what people can expect in 2020.

Ferndale City Planner Justin Lyons said the city is finalizing its selection for 25-30 streets that will be worked on as part of its pavement improvement program that voters approved a bond for in 2016.

Most of the roads that will receive updates will be residential. A significant street that Lyons highlighted was West Marshall Street between Woodward Avenue and Allen Street. West Marshall will receive new pavement, bioretention areas for stormwater management, conventional bike lanes, striped on-street parking, mid-block pedestrian crossings, curb extensions and bike parking.

“We’re also adding some trees as part of that project, and that project was partially grant funded,” Lyons said. “The city received a $308,000 grant from (the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments) as part of their Transportation Alternatives Program, so we’re excited to get that assistance, and the city’s happy that SEMCOG and (the Michigan Department of Transportation) were able to contribute funds and saw value in improving West Marshall. It’s kind of the key corridor for the city, as far as part of the Woodward neighborhood bike route and the city’s own bike route connecting to Woodward.”

The road projects have yet to be sent out to bid, but once a finalist is selected, the construction could start at the end of April or early May, Lyons explained. A look at which roads will be repaved in Ferndale can be found at ferndale mi.gov/resources/roads-streets.

Outside of the normal maintenance to fix cracks and degrading joints, Ferndale’s neighboring city, Pleasant Ridge, won’t see any major road construction in 2020, said City Manager James Breuckman.

Berkley City Manager Matt Baumgarten said the Oakland County Road Commission will have its own project resurfacing 12 Mile Road between Greenfield Road and Coolidge Highway, which he expects to happen in the first couple of weeks in June.

Berkley itself will be improving its own residential streets in the spring, though the list of streets that will be done hasn’t been finalized yet. Baumgarten said the city is evaluating streets now and that it’s a matter of what the city can address in a single construction year.

“We’ve got a program that we’re launching this year with the monies that were approved by Berkley voters,” he said. “We’re still laying out the map for that, but we’ll have a more comprehensive program than we’ve had in years past. It won’t just be reactive. We’ll be going specifically for projects where we can make the most out of the good that was approved by Berkley voters.”

In November 2018, Huntington Woods voters approved a bond for sewer repairs. When those repairs commenced, the city aimed to also reconstruct roads that the sewers run under.

In 2020, the roads the city will hit will be York Road, between Huntington Road and Borgman Avenue, and Nadine Avenue, between Scotia Road and Henley Avenue.

“There were four roads that were identified that needed to be reconstructed as part of the project. We did two last year and (we’re doing) two this year,” Huntington Woods City Manager Amy Sullivan said. “We just picked them based on location so that roads close to each other weren’t under construction at the same time.”

There could be even more road construction in Huntington Woods if residents pass a millage proposal on the March 10 ballot that would fund the Public Safety Department’s police and fire retirement pension.

If approved, the city could use money that previously went toward the pension obligations for the roads. According to a list of frequently asked questions provided by Huntington Woods, the roads in the first phase of construction would be Borgman Avenue from Huntington to York roads, Kingston Avenue from Coolidge to Berkley Avenue, Kingston from Berkley to Henley Avenue, Kingston from Scotia Road to Newport Boulevard, Humber Street from 11 Mile Road to Borgman, and Talbot Avenue from Newport to Meadowcrest Boulevard.

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