Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer said about two acres of property near 23 Mile Road and North Avenue had been searched thus far. The search area included two locations where police had reason to believe the remains of Kimberly King, or those of up to five other long-missing girls, could have been buried.

Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer said about two acres of property near 23 Mile Road and North Avenue had been searched thus far. The search area included two locations where police had reason to believe the remains of Kimberly King, or those of up to five other long-missing girls, could have been buried.

Photo by Sarah Purlee


Search for remains in missing girl cold case evolves

Police receive tips, more sought

By: Brian Louwers | Warren Weekly | Published May 18, 2018

MACOMB TOWNSHIP/WARREN —  After a weeklong search for the buried remains of up to six missing girls — including Kimberly King, of Warren, who vanished in 1979 — investigators have suspended their search of a “primary area” and are evaluating their next moves.

Supported by resources from the FBI, the Michigan State Police and the Macomb County Sheriff’s Office, the Warren Police Department executed a search warrant at a 24-acre property south of 23 Mile Road and west of North Avenue in Macomb Township on May 7. Investigators with hand tools and heavy equipment scoured the wooded land near the bank of the Clinton River’s North Branch for days.

At a press conference on May 9, Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer confirmed that the search was part of the department’s active investigation into King’s 1979 disappearance, and that new information gleaned from interviews and other potential evidence led police to the property where convicted murderer Arthur Ream buried the body of 13-year-old Cindy Zarzycki in 1986. Ream led police to Zarzycki’s body in 2008, and the new search was apparently the result of recent interviews and investigative work by Warren detectives.

“We’re not really saying where we’re going. We’ve suspended our search at that particular location,” Dwyer said May 15. “We’re meeting, as far as evaluating, and will determine exactly what our next steps will be in the investigation.”

Dwyer said about 2 acres of the property had been searched thus far. The search area included two locations where police had reason to believe the remains of Kimberly King, or those of up to five other long-missing girls, could have been buried.

The search and renewed media attention on the case reportedly generated many tips, but police are keeping a tight lid on the specifics for now. Dwyer did ask anyone with information about the missing girls or the suspect involved to contact Warren police.

“It’s very difficult. I can’t give a timetable when we’ll be back or where we’re going back to,” Dwyer said. “We’ll be evaluating what information we have and we’ll make a determination based on the search so far, some of the articles that were found at the scene, and we’ll just go from there.

“Our suspect has access to those 24 acres of property for about 15 years. It’s not unreasonable to believe he could have buried the victims anywhere within that 24-acre parcel,” Dwyer said. “We continue to receive tips and we certainly would like to have anyone that has any information, or feels that they have information, to call the Warren Police Department.”

True crime podcaster Nina Innsted, whose work on the Already Gone Podcast last fall included a segment on the Kimberly King disappearance, said she is hopeful that more tips will lead to a break in the case. The segment aired in late October, about the time the Warren Police Department’s new investigation was getting underway.

“I have faith in the investigators and their plan to push the investigation forward,” Innsted said. “Just because the dig has ceased in Macomb Township does not mean that work on the case has also stopped.”

Anyone with information about the case or the suspect is asked to contact Detective Sgt. Paul Houtos, of the Warren Police Department, at (586) 574-4777.