DIA’s Inside|Out returns to Mount Clemens

By: Julie Snyder | Mount Clemens - Clinton - Harrison Journal | Published April 14, 2017

 Viewable at Macomb Place and Pine Street is the DIA’s reproduction of “Chief Shoppenegons,” by Eanger Irving Couse.

Viewable at Macomb Place and Pine Street is the DIA’s reproduction of “Chief Shoppenegons,” by Eanger Irving Couse.

Photos by Deb Jacques

MOUNT CLEMENS — Seven locations in downtown Mount Clemens are currently harboring high-quality reproductions of masterpieces from the Detroit Institute Arts’ collection.

Through the Inside|Out program, now in its eighth year, the art reproductions will be on display for the next three months, said Jillian Reese, the DIA’s community relations program manager.

The first piece of art, titled “View of Le Crotoy, from Upstream,” by Georges Seurat, was installed outside the Anton Art Center on April 10.

“This is the third time Mount Clemens has participated in our Inside|Out program,” Reese said. “We have a strong partnership with the Anton Art Center, and we love being in Mount Clemens because it’s the county seat and centrally located in the area with a beautiful downtown setting. We always try to get a diverse range of communities to participate.”

The reproductions will be in 11 communities from April to July, and then in 10 other venues from August to October, Reese said. Each community will have between seven and 12 images clustered within walking or bike-riding distance. Other nearby communities participating this year include Fraser, St. Clair Shores, Sterling Heights and Troy.

Organizers say Inside|Out is a key component of the DIA’s community engagement efforts.

Over the past seven years, the museum has partnered with more than 100 communities and engaged tens of thousands of residents with art in places where they live, work and play. This year, the museum has expanded the number of installation sites from approximately 80 to as many as 120 per three-month season, which is more than ever before.

“Art has the powerful ability to unify, and Inside|Out allows us to bring people together outside of the museum walls,” said DIA Director Salvador Salort-Pons in a press release. “We see ourselves as more than a museum; we use art to encourage connections and improve understanding among our diverse communities.”

The DIA encourages each community to plan activities centered on its Inside|Out works; events will be planned closer to installation dates. Previous activities have included bike and walking tours, talks at libraries and community centers, festivals and more.

Phil Gilchrist, executive director with the Anton Art Center, 125 Macomb Place, said this year is the third time Mount Clemens has been chosen to participate in Inside|Out.

“I love this program,” he said. “I think it’s such a great way to get the DIA collection out to the community.”

Reese said she had help from Gilchrist and Michelle Weiss from the Downtown Development Authority with pinpointing the exact locations for the pieces of art. She said they can be found in more frequented downtown areas like the Emerald Theatre, restaurants and taverns, and even at the Macomb County Circuit Court.

New this year, the DIA is collaborating with the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History to include 10 reproductions of objects from its permanent collection. This is the first time the DIA has incorporated reproductions of works from another institution in Inside|Out displays. 

“Inside|Out is perfect for those who may be unable to go to the DIA,” Gilchrist said, adding that the art will be on display in Mount Clemens through July 10. “They can have it right in their backyard.”

All Inside|Out locations can be viewed on an interactive map on the DIA’s website. dia.org/insideout. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is sponsoring the 2017 Inside|Out program.