The contract between the cities is for two years, and Berkley will receive $100 from Lathrup Village for each prisoner.

The contract between the cities is for two years, and Berkley will receive $100 from Lathrup Village for each prisoner.

Photo provided by the Berkley Public Safety Department


Berkley to house Lathrup Village prisoners

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published April 10, 2018

BERKLEY — The Berkley City Council approved an intergovernmental agreement with Lathrup Village to house prisoners for the municipality.

The contract was approved at the April 2 council meeting, and the city will receive $100 from Lathrup Village for each prisoner. Prisoners can be lodged for up to 72 hours.

“They’ve utilized the (Oakland County) Sheriff’s Department for quite a while,” Berkley City Manager Matt Baumgarten said. “After looking through a couple of different other local jurisdictions in order to house prisoners, something a little bit closer to home, it was preferable, so (Berkley Public Safety) Chief Matthew Koehn, as well as (Police) Chief (Scott) McKee over in the city of Lathrup Village, began conversations soon after he started here, and they were able to come to an agreement.”

The agreement is for two years starting May 1 and goes through April 30, 2020. Baumgarten said they’ve not previously had a relationship such as this with Lathrup Village, so this a new revenue source for them.

Koehn said that because Lathrup Village was transporting prisoners to jail in Pontiac, the new arrangement is a lot more convenient. 

“They’re not taking their cars out of service,” he said. “We really don’t know how many prisoners we’re going to be housing, but somewhere probably around 60 to 80 a year initially, so it’s nothing that we can’t handle. The revenue that we’ll be generating will more than make up for our services. We will not charge Lathrup Village to process the prisoners.”

As detailed in a city document, a Berkley officer-in-charge must accept the prisoners; the Lathrup Village arresting officers will process the prisoners, will be responsible for personal property belonging to the prisoners, will be responsible for any costs for medical treatment, and will take conditional bonds and release the prisoners.

“We’re going to train all their personnel so they’ll be processing their own prisoners,” Koehn said. “We will help out as soon as we have the personnel available — we’ll help out booking prisoners — but it should be a pretty seamless arrangement. Chief McKee is willing to work with us to work out any issues we have.”