The Nip N’ Tuck Diner is one of two longtime restaurants that closed in Berkley in 2017. The restaurants were honored by the Berkley City Council Jan. 22.

The Nip N’ Tuck Diner is one of two longtime restaurants that closed in Berkley in 2017. The restaurants were honored by the Berkley City Council Jan. 22.

Photo by Mike Koury


Berkley restaurants honored by City Council

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published January 31, 2018

 A vintage photograph shows the Nip N’ Tuck Diner, which was owned at the time by Becky Bone’s father, Bob Arthur.

A vintage photograph shows the Nip N’ Tuck Diner, which was owned at the time by Becky Bone’s father, Bob Arthur.

Photo provided by Jeffrey Tong

BERKLEY — Two longtime restaurants that closed last year were honored by the Berkley City Council during its Jan. 22 meeting.

Ruth Hoenle, owner of Sila Italian Dining & Pizza, and Becky Bone, owner of the Nip N’ Tuck Diner, were presented with resolutions from the council in honor of their time in the city.

Hoenle had owned Sila since 2001 and had purchased the building at 4033 12 Mile Road three years ago. She decided to close the restaurant, as she felt she couldn’t keep the business going anymore.

“I can’t do it anymore. I would still be there. I would still be working if I had help, and help is hard to come by nowadays, and good help,” she said.

Hoenle decided to sell the building to Green Lantern, as she said the pizzeria had been pursuing her for a while.

“My family, we all grew up in Berkley, so Berkley’s been a big part of my life and my family’s life,” Hoenle said. “To be honored by Berkley, that was really, really nice of them. It felt good.”

Nip N’ Tuck had been in the Bone family since 1972, when it was bought by Becky Bone’s father. She took over the business when her father got sick and passed away in 2003.

Bone had worked at the restaurant since she was 11, and she said she never worked anywhere else. She said it was time for her to leave, as she felt too tired to continue working and she has ”too many miles on my body.”

“It’s 42 years, and it just consumes your life. It’s seven days a week. Even if it is a small place, it doesn’t matter. It’s still 100 percent. It’s 24/7,” she said.

Bone said she was “floored” by what the city did for her at the meeting.

“I just thought I would close up and walk away,” she said.

“Like I said, it was my home. I grew up there. It was my business, and I know it meant a lot to my customers. I mean, I’ve seen three, four generations grow through that place, but yeah, I was completely floored that the city would honor me. … The way they’ve treated me is just overwhelming to me.”