Boettcher to become new mayor in Grosse Pointe City

By: K. Michelle Moran | Grosse Pointe Times | Published November 7, 2017

 Grosse Pointe City campaign signs like these — outside Maire Elementary School — were common on lawns throughout the community.

Grosse Pointe City campaign signs like these — outside Maire Elementary School — were common on lawns throughout the community.

Photo by K. Michelle Moran

 Grosse Pointe City voters fill out ballots at Maire Elementary School on Election Day, Nov. 7.

Grosse Pointe City voters fill out ballots at Maire Elementary School on Election Day, Nov. 7.

Photo by K. Michelle Moran

Grosse Pointe City voters delivered a shakeup to the City Council when they cast their ballots Nov. 7.

Dale Scrace — who has served as the City’s mayor for the last 16 years — fell short in a bid for another two-year term, with rival Christopher Boettcher being elected to the post. Scrace had a total of 28 years as either mayor or a City Council member. Boettcher served two four-year terms on the council before announcing earlier this year that he wouldn’t be running again this fall for his council seat. He later declared his mayoral candidacy.

According to unofficial vote tallies available at press time, only 210 votes separated Boettcher from Scrace, with Boettcher receiving 1,021 votes to Scrace’s 811 votes.

“The people have spoken,” said Scrace after results came in. He said if he had been re-elected, he had only been planning on serving another two-year term as mayor before bowing out.

“I didn’t expect to end my 28-year career like this,” Scrace said. “(But) one way or another, this was my last election.”

Although he said he doesn’t plan on regularly attending council meetings, Scrace said he’s “certainly going to remain involved,” especially with regard to some of the big issues he has worked on in recent years, including the recent bond issue and new facilities for public safety and public works.

On the council side, Sheila Tomkowiak and Christopher Walsh will retain their seats. They’ll be joined by newcomer Daniel J. Williams. David Fries, the other new name on the ballot, didn’t succeed in his bid for a council seat.

With controversy of late over issues such as a possible hotel in the Village and moving public works out of the City and into a larger facility in Detroit to accommodate vehicles and equipment, voters in the City came out in high numbers for what might have otherwise been a quiet municipal election. More than 39 percent of the City’s 4,728 registered voters cast ballots Nov. 7, according to unofficial tallies available at press time.

City Clerk/Assistant City Manager Julie Arthurs said this was the first contested City election since about the mid-2000s.

“It’s been very steady,” she said of voters coming to the polls. “We’ve had great turnout. The (new election) equipment is working well — again. It’s been smooth.”

The City used the new equipment first for the facilities bond issue in August.