Director Renato Moore and Drew Hagen,  working for Travel Channel’s “Food Paradise,” film  Jack Guerra, son of co-owner Jack Guerra,  inside Cloverleaf’s kitchen March 2.

Director Renato Moore and Drew Hagen, working for Travel Channel’s “Food Paradise,” film Jack Guerra, son of co-owner Jack Guerra, inside Cloverleaf’s kitchen March 2.

Photo by Donna Agusti


Eastpointe shows its support for local restaurant during television feature

By: Bria Brown | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published March 9, 2018

 Cloverleaf co-owners and siblings Jack Guerra and Marie Easterby pose for a photo inside their family business March 2.

Cloverleaf co-owners and siblings Jack Guerra and Marie Easterby pose for a photo inside their family business March 2.

Photo by Donna Agusti

 Jenna Rucinski, a waitress at Cloverleaf, poses for a photo before preparing for the busy day ahead.

Jenna Rucinski, a waitress at Cloverleaf, poses for a photo before preparing for the busy day ahead.

Photo by Donna Agusti

 From left, Dorothy Webb, 91, of Eastpointe, and Sandy Hilkert, of St. Clair Shores, visit Cloverleaf March 2. Both are longtime customers.

From left, Dorothy Webb, 91, of Eastpointe, and Sandy Hilkert, of St. Clair Shores, visit Cloverleaf March 2. Both are longtime customers.

Photo by Donna Agusti

EASTPOINTE — Customers from near and far stood outside Cloverleaf to catch a possible glimpse of the Travel Channel’s “Food Paradise” during filming March 2. 

Cloverleaf originally planned to open at 2 p.m. to allow production and film crew access to the kitchen that morning, but the time was pushed back to 3 p.m. 

During filming, the crew set up shots in the main dining room for their “beauty shot” — which would be the focus of the show — filmed in the kitchen, and interviewed some customers. 

“Food Paradise” director Renato Moore told the Eastsider that he “wasn’t sure when the episode would air,” only because of how much work would have to go into the show’s postproduction.

Dorothy Webb, 91 — a 60-year Eastpointe resident — said she saw the story about Cloverleaf in the Eastsider and decided to come out and enjoy some pizza. Webb used to frequent the restaurant with her boyfriend. During her visit March 2, she ordered a pepperoni pizza.   

“I come here for the pizza, and they have a pasta salad. This restaurant has been in the neighborhood, it’s clean and the people are friendly,” she said. “It’s good for the neighborhood to get good recognition.”   

Ed Easterby said co-owners Maria Easterby and Jack Guerra work hard to maintain their family’s tradition.  

“Knowing how hard she works, and how hard my brother-in-law works, how hard our nephews who have the carry-outs work, we’re trying to carry on a tradition through the pizza. As a family, we appreciate everyone in the community and our customers,” said Easterby. 

Liana Easterby started working at the restaurant when she was 15 years old. 

“I’m proud. A lot of work has gone into this. It’s well overdue and deserved,” said Liana Easterby. 

Edward Easterby started working in the family business busing tables.  

“I was working at a younger age than when a lot of my other friends were. I learned to prioritize things a certain way, and seeing everything go from what it was to what it is now, the people are still the same. You always see people smiling in here and it’s nice to see the restaurant get this recognition,” he said. 

Liana explained that the Cloverleaf endured a fire back in 1994. 

“We had to remodel, adding a new room. The patio is different; there used to be an outside patio, now it’s enclosed. We had a re-grand opening,” she said.

Co-owner Jack Guerra does the purchasing for Cloverleaf, and he specifically mentioned one family member who would have been proud to see the business today.  

“It’s wonderful. I wish my dad was here to see all of this,” he said. 

Guerra said the customers have allowed Cloverleaf to stay in business as long as it has. 

According to Guerra, his father kept the name and the shamrock logo for the business. 

“When my father bought this place, it was called Cloverleaf. It was two words and had a four-leaf clover on the building. My dad kept it the same, and he worked the bar and my mom started making pizzas in the back, and that’s how they started it here,” he said.

“We try to give our customers the best we can. We’ve always kept it a family place where you can bring your children and not have to worry,” he added. 

Guerra’s son, Agostino, works at Cloverleaf twice a week, and the rest of the week, he’s at Cloverleaf’s carry-out location in Sterling Heights. 

“It’s an absolute honor and a dream come true. It’s good to see our hard work being paid off. It’s a very important thing to me and to my father,” he said. 

Guerra also mentioned why he believes the family business has lasted so long. 

“I believe the product speaks for itself. Nothing’s ever changed. Everything’s original. It’s the same pizza we’ve been making since 1946,” said Guerra.